Dyirbal


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Dyir·bal

 (jûr′bəl)
n. pl. Dyirbal or Dyir·bals
1. A member of an Aboriginal people of northeast Queensland, Australia.
2. The Pama-Nyungan language of this people, now nearly extinct.

[Dyirbal, ethnic self-designation.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dyirbal - a language of Australian aborigines
Aboriginal Australian, Australian - the Austronesian languages spoken by Australian aborigines
References in periodicals archive ?
Latin, espanol, Adjetivos con propiedades Adj/N finlandes, hungaro, similares a los nombres, igbo, quechua, dyirbal restringidos al S.
No obstante, este fenomeno se observa en mucho menor grado en bribri que en otros idiomas, como en el famoso sistema de clasificacion del dyirbal tradicional presentado en Dixon (1982), en el que la mayoria de los sustantivos son asignados a una clase por medio de asosiacion con un representante prototipico de la clase.
Thaayorre pig, Thaypan, pigipigi, Kunjen bigibig, Yimidhirr bigibigi and Dyirbal bigi (Baldwin 1983, 23).
None of the reasons we might find this bemusing would even enter the head of a Dyirbal speaker.
Companion NP- Baka, Ewe, Dogon, Coordination Hausa, Ga, Lingala, More, Yagaria, Turkish, French Creoles, Chinese Companion Possession Swahili, Baka, Lingala Instrument Ergative Hittite, Sanskrit, Avar, Agent Dyirbal, Mangarayi Instrument Passive Russian, Czech, Agent Dravidian; CFs; Greek Location Companion Greek, Carib; Romance NP- Clausal Chadic coordination Coordination Physical Companion Romance Proximity Route Instrument Greek, Russian, German, Polish etc.
The syntactic units can occur in any order which a particular language permits, so that this model of clause structure is equally applicable to both configurational languages such as English and nonconfigurational languages such as the Australian Aboriginal language Dyirbal, which has very free word order.
Dixon, RMW and Grace Koch 1996 Dyirbal Song Poetry, University of Queensland Press, St Lucia.
263-270), in a discussion of two ergative Australian languages, Warlpiri and Dyirbal, demonstrate that although there is evidence for grammatical phenomena which require the assignment of a syntactic function in each language, (10) the assignment of a blanket Subject function obscures differences in the alignment of syntactic function with the three different types of arguments which must be recognised in characterising ergativity, viz.
The languages to be discussed include English, Croatian, German, Indonesian, Kinyarwanda, Yaqui, Dyirbal, Saliba and Kayardild.
We then show that the same basic approach can explain the meters of the various metrical traditions of the world including major traditions such as those of Arabic, Sanskrit, Greek, French, as well as less widely known traditions such as those of Somali, Swahili, Latvian, Dyirbal, Welsh and Irish.
I read Noam Chomsky and Jerrold Katz and the new universal grammarians and reached the point of asking myself: If a latter-day ark were ever commissioned to take the best that mankind had to offer and make a fresh start on the farther planets, if it ever came down to that, might we not leave Shakespeare's plays and Beethoven's quartets behind to make room for the last aboriginal speaker of Dyirbal, even though that might be a fat old woman who scratched herself and smelled bad?
According to Bob Dixon, in 1963 the Dyirbal language in northern Queensland was spoken by the whole community over the age of 35, amounting to 100 people.