dysbindin


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dysbindin

(dɪsˈbɪndɪn)
n
(Genetics) a gene associated with schizophrenia
[C20: from dys(trobrevin-)bind(ing) (prote)in]
References in periodicals archive ?
25) Studies in humans have identified a gene called dysbindin on chromosome 6 and another called SNAP-25 on chromosome 20 that are associated with cognitive ability.
We know that in schizophrenia this ability is reduced, and now, knowing more about why this happens may help explain how loss of a protein called dysbindin leads to some symptoms of schizophrenia.
Previous genetic studies had found that some forms of the gene for dysbindin were found in people with schizophrenia.
Arnold, MD, director of the Penn Memory Center, used a mouse with a mutated dysbindin gene to understand how reduced dysbindin protein may cause symptoms of schizophrenia.
They discovered how a specific set of nerve cells that control fast brain activity lose their effectiveness when dysbindin protein levels are reduced.
The susceptibility genes with the strongest evidence are dystrobrevin binding protein 1 or dysbindin (DTNB1) and neuregulin 1 (NRG1).
3 gene DTNBP1, the human ortholog of the mouse dysbindin gene, is associated with schizophrenia.
Consistent evidence has been gathered that supports a role for the gene that codes for dysbindin in schizophrenia.
3 gene, dysbindin, in sib-pair families with linkage and in an additional sample of triad families.
3 Gene DTNBPI, the Human Ortholog of the Mouse Dysbindin Gene, is Associated with Schizophrenia.
Neuregulin 1, dysbindin, DISC1, DAOA (G72), PRODH, and COMT are among the many odd-sounding genes located on various chromosomes.