dystopia

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dys·to·pi·a

 (dĭs-tō′pē-ə)
n.
1. An imaginary place or state in which the condition of life is extremely bad, as from deprivation, oppression, or terror.
2. A work describing such a place or state: "dystopias such as Brave New World" (Times Literary Supplement).

dystopia

(dɪsˈtəʊpɪə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an imaginary place where everything is as bad as it can be
[C19 (coined by John Stuart Mill): from dys- + Utopia]
dysˈtopian adj, n

dys•to•pi•a

(dɪsˈtoʊ pi ə)

n., pl. -pi•as.
an imaginary society in which social or technological trends have culminated in a greatly diminished quality of life or degradation of values. Compare Utopia.
[1865–70; dys- + (U)topia]
dys•to′pi•an, adj.

dystopia

an imaginary place where the conditions and quality of life are unpleasant. The opposite of Utopia.
See also: Utopia
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dystopia - state in which the conditions of life are extremely bad as from deprivation or oppression or terror
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
utopia - ideally perfect state; especially in its social and political and moral aspects
2.dystopia - a work of fiction describing an imaginary place where life is extremely bad because of deprivation or oppression or terror
fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
Translations
DystopieGegenutopieMätopieAnti-Utopie
dystopia
distopia

dystopia

nDystopie f
References in periodicals archive ?
It used to be a harrowing, dystopic vision of the truth, and now it's relaxing.
Scholar Ada Barbaro has said she considers Moussa the "father of the dystopic novel" in Arabic fiction for his The Lord Arrived from the Spinach Field .
As far as Amazon is concerned, the dystopic, post-apocalyptic novel, published only in 1968 and later loosely adapted into the 1982 neo-noir science fiction film Blade Runner, is now out of print--and if not for the rekindling of our love affair with books that, to my observation, began in 2012, it would have been out of memory forever.
Sorkin put it to Sophia that dystopic scenarios like those depicted in Blade Runner could easily pan out with the rise of robots.
Drive down to Blue Marlin Ibiza UAE, the oasis-like beach club which has been transformed into a dystopic playground inspired by the popular desert festival, 'Burning Man'.
Ryan Gosling takes centre stage here as Agent K, a Blade Runner working the rough and tough streets of dystopic Los Angeles some 30 years after the original film.
7 the girl with all the gifts 2016 IN A dystopic near future society has collapsed following humanity's infection with a mysterious fungal disease that turns them into fast-moving, flesh-eating 'hungries'.
Written in the aftermath of World War II, George Orwell's famous novel, '1984,' paints a dystopic vision of the future.
Daniel delivers an immaculately crafted, genuinely human portrait of a future both idyllic and dystopic.
Building on an Egyptian literary dystopic tradition, Basma Abdel Aziz transforms queuing into a metaphor for the pervasive institutional and moral corruption of Egyptian life post-Arab Spring.
In that year, only The Wachowskis' Matrix sequels and a middling Terminator sequel (Jonathan Mostow) turned their gaze to the end of the world; (1) in contrast, 2015's financially successful films included a broad range of dystopic and apocalyptic (post- or otherwise) futures, whether it's a self-aware robot threatening global destruction (take your pick between the titular antagonist in Joss Whedon's Avengers: Age of Ultron or the latest iteration of Skynet in Alan Taylor's Terminator: Genisys) or plucky teenagers standing up to self-involved governments (Francis Lawrence's The Hunger Games: Mockingjay--Part 2, Robert Schwentke's Insurgent and Wes Ball's Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials).
Films that depict the audience's present-day city are often dark, such as Sunset Boulevard (1950), which is characterized by desperation; Falling Down (1993), which addresses social frustrations in an increasingly overpopulated, impoverished, and diverse city; and even Blade Runner (1982) in its depiction of a dystopic future.