Dyula


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Dyula

(diːˈuːlə; ˈdjuːlə)
npl -la or -las
1. (Peoples) a member of a negroid people of W Africa, living chiefly in the rain forests of Côte d'Ivoire, where they farm rice, etc
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Mande branch of the Niger-Congo family
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References in periodicals archive ?
Since Adire traders came from faraway places such as Senegal, Dyula in Cameroon, Ghana, Congo, and even all over Nigeria, among others, the Egba traders initially relied on interpreters to translate from English to Yoruba.
formes: dioula, djoula, dyoula, dyula, djula, jula.
Conrad (2004) notes that today, "Mande-speaking peoples include the Maninka of northeastern Guinea and southern Mall, the Bamana of Mall, the Mandinka of Senegambia and Guinea Bissau, and the Dyula of northern Cote d'Ivoire" (p.
Marie Perinbam, "Notes on Dyula Origins and Nomenclature," Bulletin de l'Institut Fondamentale de Recherche de l'Afrique Noire Serie.
Bisa); colonisation between the 15th and 17th centuries, which is that of the Moose, Gulmanceba, Fulbe, Yarse, Marka, Zara; and colonisation at the end of the 17th century, which is that of the Lobi, Dagara, Hausa, Dyula.
Spirit Media: The Electronic Media and Islam among the Dyula of Northern Cote d'Ivoire.
Person, Samori, une Revolution Dyula, vols 1-3 (Dakar, Institut Fondamental d'Afrique Noire, 1968).
The Dyula kingdom of Kong (Bernus 1960; Person 1968; Derive 1977), that flourished in present-day Ivorian territory, was created by conquering warriors, as happened elsewhere in West Africa.
In the north there were also Mande societies, like the Malinke; in part they had been converted to Islam, like the Dyula merchants whose trade network covered a wide area of pre-colonial West Africa.
Bisa); le peuplement entre le XVe et le XVIIe siecle qui est celui des Moose, Gulmanceba, Fulbe, Yarse, Marka, Zara; et le peuplement a partir de la fin du XVIIe siecle qui est celui des Lobi, Dagara, Hausa, Dyula.
Its particular focus is the old quartier of Koko, established centuries ago by Muslim Dyula traders, 'across the stream' from the seat of a 'pagan' Senufo chiefdom which the French made into the administrative centre of the region.
It has been dubbed 'Suwarian' by Ivor Wilks after the scholar from whom all Dyula lines of religious learning trace their origin.