eniac


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eniac

(ˈɛnɪæk)
n
(Computer Science) an early type of computer built in the 1940s
References in periodicals archive ?
While the article correctly stated that ENIAC was conceived and eventually used to calculate artillery firing tables, it omitted its first--and at the time still classified purpose--solving mathematical problems necessary to build the first atom bombs.
The brewery has garnered accolades since its May 2015 opening, including earning a Bronze medal at the prestigious 2015 Great American Beer Festival[R] (GABF) competition and several medals at the 2016 Washington Beer Awards, including Gold for their ENIAC Mosaic IPA.
According to her husband Herman, himself an important pioneer in the field of computing and the head of the development team for the ENIAC during the early 1940s, most of the credit for ENIAC's success goes to Adele Goldstine (Greene 76).
The most groundbreaking computer was the ENIAC , in 1946, and the other "automatic" computers that followed it.
The institute's computer, MANIAC, was not the first all-purpose digital electronic computer (that was ENIAC, at the University of Pennsylvania), but in Dyson's telling it was the most influential.
Like the Internet that came after it, the ENIAC was designed initially for military purposes, in its case to calculate the ideal trajectories for artillery and mortars to maximize the chances of hitting their target.
The recent death at age 86 of Jean Bartik, last of the original ENIAC programmers, shines light once again on the thorny but fascinating question of who invented the computer.
What emerged from all this brainstorming was the first computer, born in 1944 and named ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer).
THE COLOSSUS was the fastest computer of World War II, not the ENIAC [as stated in number 15 the "100 Ways"].
Light documents how women's important contributions to the invention of ENIAC, the first computer, were rendered invisible in contemporary accounts and photographs.