Early Christian

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Early Christian

adj
(Architecture) denoting or relating to the style of architecture that started in Italy in the 3rd century ad and spread through the Roman empire until the 5th century
References in periodicals archive ?
Early Christianity in Contexts: An Exploration across Cultures and Continents.
In the Vatican daily, a detailed and critical analysis of King's research by leading Coptic scholar Alberto Camplani accompanies a column by the newspaper's editor, Giovanni Maria Vian, who is a historian of early Christianity.
The Making of Paul: Constructions of the Apostle in Early Christianity.
The newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, published an article on Thursday by leading Coptic scholar Alberto Camplani and an accompanying editorial by the newspaper's editor, Giovanni Maria Vian, an expert in early Christianity, the Washington Post reported.
THE GNOSTICS: MYTH, RITUAL, AND DIVERSITY IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY.
THE JESUS DISCOVERY: THE NEW ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIND THAT REVEALS THE BIRTH OF CHRISTIANITY outlines a major archaeological discovery that changes ideas about Jesus and early Christianity, and comes from a renowned biblical scholar and an award-winning documentary filmmaker who team up to present the archaeological evidence directly connected to Jesus' first followers.
Chapter 6, "Boundaries, Identity, and Labels," reviews and refutes the various ways that scholars have attempted to blur the clear boundary between early Christianity and ancient Judaism.
He said: "It's still very early days but there will be breakthroughs in terms of our understanding of early Christianity.
Make no mistake that the reality of this is very real, from people who in early Christianity were willing to be torn apart in Roman arenas for their faith to people today being set free from all kinds of addictions and diseases, living dramatically changed lives.
Scholars of early Christianity are in agreement that interest in the mother of Jesus was mostly initiated by the need to clarify the church's teachings about the nature of Christ, his relationship with God, and the salvation Christ accomplished.
Charles Freeman, A New History of Early Christianity.
What sets Dacy's work apart from the voluminous secondary research on the topic is the way she has collected the evidence: Dacy maps a series of "separations" between early Christianity and Judaism that can be distinctly analysed, but that also in some ways overlap.

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