Thrace

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Thrace

 (thrās)
A region and ancient country of the southeast Balkan Peninsula north of the Aegean Sea. In ancient times it extended as far north as the Danube River. The region was colonized by Greeks in the sixth century bc and later passed under the control of Rome, Byzantium, and Ottoman Turkey. In the 19th and 20th centuries, much of the region passed to Bulgaria and Greece.

Thrace

(θreɪs)
n
1. (Placename) an ancient country in the E Balkan Peninsula: successively under the Persians, Macedonians, and Romans
2. (Placename) a region of SE Europe, corresponding to the S part of the ancient country: divided by the Maritsa River into Western Thrace (Greece) and Eastern Thrace (Turkey)

Thrace

(θreɪs)

n.
1. an ancient region of varying extent in the E part of the Balkan Peninsula: later a Roman province; now in Bulgaria, Turkey, and Greece.
2. a modern region corresponding to the S part of the Roman province: now divided between Greece (Western Thrace) and Turkey (Eastern Thrace).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thrace - an ancient country and wine producing region in the east of the Balkan Peninsula to the north of the Aegean SeaThrace - an ancient country and wine producing region in the east of the Balkan Peninsula to the north of the Aegean Sea; colonized by ancient Greeks; later a Roman province; now divided between Bulgaria and Greece and Turkey
battle of Lule Burgas, Lule Burgas - the principal battle of the Balkan Wars (1912); Bulgarian forces defeated the Turks
Balkan Peninsula, Balkans - a large peninsula in southeastern Europe containing the Balkan Mountain Range
Thracian - an inhabitant of ancient Thrace
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1928 population census appears to be the only accurate database, which while recording a number of 1,221,849 refugees, including in them also those coming from Bulgaria, the Caucasus, eastern Thrace and Constantinople, distinguishes them in "bourgeois" (urban residents, townsmen) (673,025 in number) and "peasants" (578.
The 1934 anti-Jewish pogrom in eastern Thrace, and the 1955 anti-Christian pogrom in Istanbul, forced tens of thousands of non-Muslims to flee Turkey.
After an introduction to the country's geography, political institutions, economic structure, and cultural characteristics, chapters cover the ancient history of Anatolia and Eastern Thrace, from the Paleolithic age to the Seljuk Turkish victory over Byzantine armies at Manzikert; the Turkish conquest of Anatolia and the imperial rule of the Ottoman sultans; the Young Turk revolution, War of Independence, and early years of the republic; Turkish multi-party democracy up to the military coup of September 12, 1980; the effects of military rule; the Justice and Development Party years; and the Gezi Park protests and Turkish life since then, emphasizing the legacy of Mustafa Kemal Pasha AtatErk, the first president.
Before, in 1934, there was a "rehearsal" against Jews in eastern Thrace, but Sept.
The site is situated in the eastern Thrace region of northern Greece.
The terms of that agreement meant the mass expulsion of ethnic Greeks living in western Anatolia, as well as the territory of Eastern Thrace on the European mainland.
The Adrianople in Eastern Thrace vilayet joined the uprising on August 19, 1903, the Transfiguration, or Preobrazhenie in Bulgarian.
Unfortunately, the treaty gave Greece Eastern Thrace, land in Anatolia and Turkey's third largest city Smyrna, now Izmir.
Women appear in only two chapters: a vestigial queen dips a rose bush in "L'Envoi" (the concluding chapter) and "There was a woman having a kid" during the torturous evacuation of Greek civilians from Eastern Thrace (Chapter II).

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