theocracy

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the·oc·ra·cy

 (thē-ŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. the·oc·ra·cies
1. Government ruled by or subject to religious authority.
2. A country or state governed in this way.

theocracy

(θɪˈɒkrəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government by a deity or by a priesthood
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a community or political unit under such government
ˈtheoˌcrat n
ˌtheoˈcratic, ˌtheoˈcratical adj
ˌtheoˈcratically adv

the•oc•ra•cy

(θiˈɒk rə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. a form of government in which God or a deity is recognized as the supreme ruler.
2. a system of government by priests claiming a divine commission.
3. a commonwealth or state under such a form of government.
[1615–25; < Greek theokratía. See theo-, -cracy]
the′o•crat` (-əˌkræt) n.
the`o•crat′ic, the`o•crat′i•cal, adj.
the`o•crat′i•cal•ly, adv.

theocracy

1. a system of government in which God or a deity is held to be the civil ruler; thearchy.
2. a system of government by priests; hagiarchy.
3. a state under such a form of rule. — theocrat, n.theocratic, adj.
See also: Government
a system of government in which a deity is considered the civil ruler. Also called thearchy.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theocracy - a political unit governed by a deity (or by officials thought to be divinely guided)
church-state - a state ruled by religious authority
hierocracy - a ruling body composed of clergy
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
2.theocracy - the belief in government by divine guidance
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Translations
papi uralomteokrácia

theocracy

[θɪˈɒkrəsɪ] Nteocracia f

theocracy

nTheokratie f

theocracy

[θɪˈɒkrəsɪ] n (Pol) → teocrazia
References in periodicals archive ?
Post shows how the rise of universities in the 12th century coincided with the assertion by the papacy of its international power and with the centralization of ecclesiastical government in the Roman Court.
During the late 1660s and early 1670s the development of an ecclesiastical government, coupled with its complete adoption of George Fox's Peace Testimony, tempered and shaped the direction, though not the intensity of Quaker dissent.