ecology

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e·col·o·gy

 (ĭ-kŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. e·col·o·gies
1.
a. The science of the relationships between organisms and their environments.
b. The relationship between organisms and their environment.

[German Ökologie : Greek oikos, house; see weik- in Indo-European roots + German -logie, study (from Greek -logiā, -logy).]

ec′o·log′i·cal (ĕk′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl, ē′kə-), ec′o·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
ec′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
e·col′o·gist n.

ecology

(ɪˈkɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Environmental Science) the study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment
2. (Environmental Science) the set of relationships of a particular organism with its environment
3. (Sociology) the study of the relationships between human groups and their physical environment
Also called (for senses 1, 2): bionomics
[C19: from German Ökologie, from Greek oikos house (hence, environment)]
eˈcologist n

e•col•o•gy

(ɪˈkɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the branch of biology dealing with the relations and interactions between organisms and their environment.
2. the set of relationships existing between organisms and their environment.
3. Also called human ecology. the branch of sociology concerned with the spacing and interdependence of people and institutions.
4. the advocacy of protection of the air, water, and other natural resources from pollution or its effects; environmentalism.
[1870–75; earlier oecology < German Ökologie (1868) < Greek oîk(os) house + -o- -o- + German -logie -logy]
ec•o•log•i•cal (ˌɛk əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl, ˌi kə-) ec`o•log′ic, adj.
ec`o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
e•col′o•gist, n.

e·col·o·gy

(ĭ-kŏl′ə-jē)
1. The scientific study of the relationships between living things and their environments.
2. A system of such relationships: the fragile ecology of the desert.

ecology, oecology

1. the branch of biology that studies the relations between plants and animals and their environment. Also called bionomics, bionomy.
2. the branch of sociology that studies the environmental spacing and interdependence of people and institutions, as in rural or in urban settings. — ecologist, oecologist, n.ecological, oecological, adj.ecologically, oecologically, adv.
See also: Biology
1. the branch of biology that studies the relationship of organisms and environments. Also called bionomics, bionomy.
2. the branch of sociology that studies the environmental spacing and interdependence of people and their institutions, as in rural or urban settings. — ecologist, oecologist, n. — ecologie, oecologic, ecological, oecological, adj.
See also: Environment
the branch of sociology that studies the environmental spacing and interdependence of people and their institutions. — ecologist, oecologist, n.ecologie, oecologic, ecological, oecological, adj.
See also: Society

ecology

1. The study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment.
2. Study of the relationships between living things and their enviroment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ecology - the environment as it relates to living organismsecology - the environment as it relates to living organisms; "it changed the ecology of the island"
environment - the totality of surrounding conditions; "he longed for the comfortable environment of his living room"
2.ecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environmentecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
palaeoecology, paleoecology - the branch of ecology that studies ancient ecology
biotic community, community - (ecology) a group of interdependent organisms inhabiting the same region and interacting with each other
association - (ecology) a group of organisms (plants and animals) that live together in a certain geographical region and constitute a community with a few dominant species
food chain - (ecology) a community of organisms where each member is eaten in turn by another member
food pyramid - (ecology) a hierarchy of food chains with the principal predator at the top; each level preys on the level below
food cycle, food web - (ecology) a community of organisms where there are several interrelated food chains
ecesis, establishment - (ecology) the process by which a plant or animal becomes established in a new habitat
ecological succession, succession - (ecology) the gradual and orderly process of change in an ecosystem brought about by the progressive replacement of one community by another until a stable climax is established
ecological niche, niche - (ecology) the status of an organism within its environment and community (affecting its survival as a species)
cosmopolitan, widely distributed - growing or occurring in many parts of the world; "a cosmopolitan herb"; "cosmopolitan in distribution"
endemic - native to or confined to a certain region; "the islands have a number of interesting endemic species"
eutrophic - (ecology) of a lake or other body of water rich in nutrients and subject to eutrophication

ecology

noun environment, conditions, situation, scene, surroundings, context, habitat the effects of changes in climate on the coastal ecology
Translations
عِلْمُ البِيئَةعِلْم البيئَه
екология
ecologia
ekologie
økologi
ekologio
ekologia
ekologija
ökológia
ecologia
ekologi
vistfræîi
生態学
생태학
oecologia
ekologijaekologinisekologiškaiekologas
ekoloģija
ecologie
životné prostredie
ekologija
ekologijaекологија
ekologi
นิเวศวิทยา
çevrebilimçevrebilimiekologi
екологія
sinh thái học

ecology

[ɪˈkɒlədʒɪ]
A. Necología f
B. CPD ecology movement Nmovimiento m ecologista

ecology

[ɪˈkɒlədʒi] nécologie fe-commerce ecommerce [ˈiːkɒmɜːrs] ncommerce m électronique

ecology

nÖkologie f

ecology

[ɪˈkɒlədʒɪ] necologia

ecology

(iˈkolədʒi) noun
(the study of) living things considered in relation to their environment. Pollution has a disastrous effect on the ecology of a region.
eˈcologist noun
ˌecoˈlogical (iː-) adjective
ˌecoˈlogically adverb

ecology

عِلْمُ البِيئَة ekologie økologi Ökologie οικολογία ecología ekologia écologie ekologija ecologia 生態学 생태학 ecologie økologi ekologia ecologia экология ekologi นิเวศวิทยา çevrebilim sinh thái học 生态

e·col·o·gy

n. ecología, estudio de plantas y animales en relación con el ambiente.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is an opportunity on any ecological factor to characterize quantitatively the range in which the species can exist (its valency) and to estimate ecological tolerance in relation to separate factors and their complexes.
The Brazilian theologian explains that, among other things, these characters do not consider the ecological factor, imbalances which threatens our civilization.
Economic factors mainly refer to as exotic landscape level, suitable for recreation, appropriate travel period reflect elements of ice snow tourism resource economic value; cultural elements mainly refers to like the concept of landscape design art, tourism and cultural heterogeneity, the theme of cultural reflect ice snow tourism resources value and culture value elements; ecological factor mainly refers to as landscape ecology, ecological resources of integrity, environmental protection etc.
The ants of Dallas County, Texas, and their nesting sites: with particular reference to soil texture as an ecological factor.
The ecological factor of profession demonstrates the potential duality of a teacher's role as "personal" and "professional.
Family structure is another ecological factor that may play a significant role in the development of African American males.
Internal green marketing is the series of activities taking place in the organization aimed at ensuring that all the firm's personnel incorporate the ecological factor into their decision-making and activities.
In this family, the unavailability of biologically unrelated mates was the main reason for arranging marriage among first cousins; this ecological factor is often mentioned as one of the many reason for such unions.
This water availability is a more correlated ecological factor with the geographic distribution of the vegetal species than the precipitation.
In contrast to the self-concept model, however, the addition of the individual level ecological factor on step 2, [R.
This ecological factor sits oddly beside his later descriptions of how quickly food production now multiplies from China and India to the west, once proper price incentives are given to farmers; let alone besides his possibly justified optimism about the biotech revolution, which he somewhat turns into pessimism by fearing it may wipe out poor farmers in Africa.

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