ecology

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e·col·o·gy

 (ĭ-kŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. e·col·o·gies
1.
a. The science of the relationships between organisms and their environments.
b. The relationship between organisms and their environment.

[German Ökologie : Greek oikos, house; see weik- in Indo-European roots + German -logie, study (from Greek -logiā, -logy).]

ec′o·log′i·cal (ĕk′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl, ē′kə-), ec′o·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
ec′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
e·col′o·gist n.

ecology

(ɪˈkɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Environmental Science) the study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment
2. (Environmental Science) the set of relationships of a particular organism with its environment
3. (Sociology) the study of the relationships between human groups and their physical environment
Also called (for senses 1, 2): bionomics
[C19: from German Ökologie, from Greek oikos house (hence, environment)]
eˈcologist n

e•col•o•gy

(ɪˈkɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the branch of biology dealing with the relations and interactions between organisms and their environment.
2. the set of relationships existing between organisms and their environment.
3. Also called human ecology. the branch of sociology concerned with the spacing and interdependence of people and institutions.
4. the advocacy of protection of the air, water, and other natural resources from pollution or its effects; environmentalism.
[1870–75; earlier oecology < German Ökologie (1868) < Greek oîk(os) house + -o- -o- + German -logie -logy]
ec•o•log•i•cal (ˌɛk əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl, ˌi kə-) ec`o•log′ic, adj.
ec`o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
e•col′o•gist, n.

e·col·o·gy

(ĭ-kŏl′ə-jē)
1. The scientific study of the relationships between living things and their environments.
2. A system of such relationships: the fragile ecology of the desert.

ecology, oecology

1. the branch of biology that studies the relations between plants and animals and their environment. Also called bionomics, bionomy.
2. the branch of sociology that studies the environmental spacing and interdependence of people and institutions, as in rural or in urban settings. — ecologist, oecologist, n.ecological, oecological, adj.ecologically, oecologically, adv.
See also: Biology
1. the branch of biology that studies the relationship of organisms and environments. Also called bionomics, bionomy.
2. the branch of sociology that studies the environmental spacing and interdependence of people and their institutions, as in rural or urban settings. — ecologist, oecologist, n. — ecologie, oecologic, ecological, oecological, adj.
See also: Environment
the branch of sociology that studies the environmental spacing and interdependence of people and their institutions. — ecologist, oecologist, n.ecologie, oecologic, ecological, oecological, adj.
See also: Society

ecology

1. The study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment.
2. Study of the relationships between living things and their enviroment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ecology - the environment as it relates to living organismsecology - the environment as it relates to living organisms; "it changed the ecology of the island"
environment - the totality of surrounding conditions; "he longed for the comfortable environment of his living room"
2.ecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environmentecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
palaeoecology, paleoecology - the branch of ecology that studies ancient ecology
biotic community, community - (ecology) a group of interdependent organisms inhabiting the same region and interacting with each other
association - (ecology) a group of organisms (plants and animals) that live together in a certain geographical region and constitute a community with a few dominant species
food chain - (ecology) a community of organisms where each member is eaten in turn by another member
food pyramid - (ecology) a hierarchy of food chains with the principal predator at the top; each level preys on the level below
food cycle, food web - (ecology) a community of organisms where there are several interrelated food chains
ecesis, establishment - (ecology) the process by which a plant or animal becomes established in a new habitat
ecological succession, succession - (ecology) the gradual and orderly process of change in an ecosystem brought about by the progressive replacement of one community by another until a stable climax is established
ecological niche, niche - (ecology) the status of an organism within its environment and community (affecting its survival as a species)
cosmopolitan, widely distributed - growing or occurring in many parts of the world; "a cosmopolitan herb"; "cosmopolitan in distribution"
endemic - native to or confined to a certain region; "the islands have a number of interesting endemic species"
eutrophic - (ecology) of a lake or other body of water rich in nutrients and subject to eutrophication

ecology

noun environment, conditions, situation, scene, surroundings, context, habitat the effects of changes in climate on the coastal ecology
Translations
عِلْمُ البِيئَةعِلْم البيئَه
екология
ecologia
ekologie
økologi
ekologio
ekologia
ekologija
ökológia
ecologia
ekologi
vistfræîi
生態学
생태학
oecologia
ekologijaekologinisekologiškaiekologas
ekoloģija
ecologie
životné prostredie
ekologija
ekologijaекологија
ekologi
นิเวศวิทยา
çevrebilimçevrebilimiekologi
екологія
sinh thái học

ecology

[ɪˈkɒlədʒɪ]
A. Necología f
B. CPD ecology movement Nmovimiento m ecologista

ecology

[ɪˈkɒlədʒi] nécologie fe-commerce ecommerce [ˈiːkɒmɜːrs] ncommerce m électronique

ecology

nÖkologie f

ecology

[ɪˈkɒlədʒɪ] necologia

ecology

(iˈkolədʒi) noun
(the study of) living things considered in relation to their environment. Pollution has a disastrous effect on the ecology of a region.
eˈcologist noun
ˌecoˈlogical (iː-) adjective
ˌecoˈlogically adverb

ecology

عِلْمُ البِيئَة ekologie økologi Ökologie οικολογία ecología ekologia écologie ekologija ecologia 生態学 생태학 ecologie økologi ekologia ecologia экология ekologi นิเวศวิทยา çevrebilim sinh thái học 生态

e·col·o·gy

n. ecología, estudio de plantas y animales en relación con el ambiente.
References in periodicals archive ?
By the end of the five-year study, the team will have some basic information about the ecological factors that regulate vibrio populations.
c]--weight coefficients of energy, economical and ecological factors.
450), thus ignoring family and ecological factors affecting the student.
169-99), focuses on the operation of the army and its successes and failures, blending ecological factors, strategy, tactics, logistics, and weaponry.
This was a finding that would contradict prevailing opinions in the Great Lakes, specifically that lake trout, which had declined to extirpation--in other words the population was gone by 1960--was due to other ecological factors, not chemical toxicity," Cook says.
One of the tasks facing any student is to craft a career path, a process influenced by ecological factors (e.
This perspective fails to account for the social and ecological factors that over time have created a high concentration of crime, violence, and poverty, in many urban environments.
The central government regularly sets annual growth targets of nine per cent GDP, but these do not take ecological factors into account.
The purpose of this article is to discuss some of the ecological factors that need to be considered when using conspecific attraction as a management tool for birds.
With the use of geo-spatial technologies it is most likely to establish a reliable rate of deforestation but also assessing forests and woodlands recovery and regenerating potential basing on species composition, site classification and including other ecological factors such as being in low or mountainous areas.
Also ecological factors have promoted the recycling of steel and other metals, as the use of recycled raw material significantly lowers the energy consumption and pollutant production in, for example, steel production.
These differences in sapwood and heartwood ratios might be attributed to ecological factors such as altitude, lime and organic material content of the soil, and soil type.

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