recession

(redirected from Economic depression)
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re·ces·sion 1

 (rĭ-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The fact or action of moving away or back, especially:
a. The erosion of a cliff or headland from a given point, as from the action of a waterfall.
b. The reduction of a glacier from a point of advancement.
c. The motion of celestial objects away from one another in an expanding universe.
2. A significant period of economic decline from the peak to the trough of a business cycle, characterized by decreasing aggregate output and often by rising unemployment.
3. The withdrawal in a line or file of participants in a ceremony, especially clerics and choir members after a church service.

[Latin recessiō, recessiōn-, from recessus, past participle of recēdere, to recede; see recede1.]

re·ces′sion·ar′y adj.

re·ces·sion 2

 (rē-sĕsh′ən)
n. Law
The restoration of property by a grantee back to the previous owner by means of a legal conveyance.

recession

(rɪˈsɛʃən)
n
1. (Economics) a temporary depression in economic activity or prosperity
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the withdrawal of the clergy and choir in procession from the chancel at the conclusion of a church service
3. the act of receding
4. (Building) a part of a building, wall, etc, that recedes
[C17: from Latin recessio; see recess]

recession

(riːˈsɛʃən)
n
the act of restoring possession to a former owner
[C19: from re- + cession]

re•ces•sion

(rɪˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. a period of economic decline when production, employment, and earnings fall below normal levels.
2. the act of receding or withdrawing.
3. a receding part of a wall, building, etc.
4. a withdrawing procession, as at the end of a religious service.
[1640–50; < Latin recessiō. See recess, -tion]
re•ces′sion•ar′y, adj.

Recession

 of economists—Lipton, 1970.

recession

A temporary decline in economic activity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recession - the state of the economy declinesrecession - the state of the economy declines; a widespread decline in the GDP and employment and trade lasting from six months to a year
economic condition - the condition of the economy
2.recession - a small concavity
pharyngeal recess - a small recess in the wall of the pharynx
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
3.recession - the withdrawal of the clergy and choir from the chancel to the vestry at the end of a church service
procession - the group action of a collection of people or animals or vehicles moving ahead in more or less regular formation; "processions were forbidden"
4.recession - the act of ceding back
ceding, cession - the act of ceding
5.recession - the act of becoming more distant
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"

recession

noun depression, drop, decline, slump, downturn, slowdown, trough The recession caused sales to drop off.
boom, upturn
Quotations
"It's a recession when your neighbour loses his job; it's a depression when you lose yours" [Harry S. Truman]

recession

noun
A period of decreased business activity and high unemployment:
Translations
تَراجُع، إنْحِسارركود
hospodářský poklesrecese
lavkonjunkturrecession
lamalamakausilaskusuhdannetaantuma
recesija
gazdasági pangásrecesszió
efnahagsleg lægî, samdráttur
不況景気後退衰退退去
불경기
nuosmukis
lejupslīde
hospodársky pokles
lågkonjunktur
การตกต่ำทางเศรษฐกิจ
tình trạng suy thoái

recession

[rɪˈseʃən] N
1. (Econ) → recesión f
to be in recessionestar en recesión or retroceso
2. (frm) (= receding) → retroceso m

recession

[rɪˈsɛʃən] n (ECONOMICS)récession f
to go into recession → entrer en récession
to be in recession → être en récession

recession

n
no pl (receding) → Zurückweichen f, → Rückgang m; (Eccl) → Auszug m
(Econ) → Rezession f, → (wirtschaftlicher) Rückgang

recession

[rɪˈsɛʃn] n (Econ) → recessione f

recession

(rəˈseʃən) noun
a temporary fall in a country's or the world's business activities.

recession

ركود recese lavkonjunktur Rezession ύφεση recesión lamakausi récession recesija recessione 景気後退 불경기 recessie tilbakegang recesja recessão спад lågkonjunktur การตกต่ำทางเศรษฐกิจ durgunluk tình trạng suy thoái 衰退

re·ces·sion

n. recesión, retirada, retroceso patológico de tejidos tal como la retracción de la encía.
References in periodicals archive ?
The last time in the long economic record that inequalities were almost as high was in the lead up to the economic crash of 1929 and the economic depression of the 1930s," researchers said.
Yilmaz said the recent global economic downturn was the worst since the Great Depression, the severe worldwide economic depression in the decade preceding World War II.
I know that the country is facing an economic crisis, but in times of war, recession and economic depression, it is music that has kept up the spirits of this country.
Kabbun predicted that last year's economic depression would still be affecting the insurance market this year and next, and the market could begin to recover only in the second half of 2011.
THE DUST BOWL was a term used for the confluence of drought, misuse of land, wind erosion and economic depression that occurred in the U.
DAVID Cameron warned of the dangers of repeating the mistakes which led to economic depression in the 1930s, as world leaders struggled to find consensus at the G20 summit in Seoul.
In periods of economic depression and social upheaval we will always end up with social disorder but things can be different.
Chapters discuss the rampant development schemes of the late twentieth century that, in the new era of economic depression and narco-violence, have left beaches crowded with derelict high rise condominiums and bull-dozed and abandoned building sites, as well as widespread pollution, cultural and environmental damage wrought in the name of homeland security and the machinations of energy corporations maneuvering to avoid regulation.
So they are in no position to pay extra interest to fatten the profits of the greedy, incompetent banks who caused this vicious downward spiral of economic depression.
FEW topics seem more natural and, sadly, timelier than American religion in bad economic times, our own or the economic depression of the 1930s.
There was economic depression in the 1930s, spivs and a crimewave in the blackout, teddy boy gangs in the 50s, mods and rockers riots in the 60s.
As the story is partly set in the 1890s, it's the time of a serious economic depression as well as being prior to the Federation of Australia --and the story throws up some interesting elements about these issues.

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