economic determinism


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economic determinism

n
(Sociology) a doctrine that states that all cultural, social, political, and intellectual activities are a product of the economic organization of society

economic determinism

The belief that all activities, such as cultural and political ones, arise from the economic organization of society.
References in periodicals archive ?
So let's not slip into an arid economic determinism that ignores the profundity of what is at stake.
These are all legitimate questions but despite my strong belief in economic determinism I am not an economist who can answer them with confidence.
Eagleton proceeds by mentioning the fifth allegation, that Marxism is nothing but mere economic determinism.
In their view, contemporary scholars miss or mischaracterize distinctive features of American constitutional law and politics by remaining too harnessed to Beard's economic determinism.
According to the author, the book may be read "as a sustained argument against the hegemonies of biological determinism and economic determinism.
He said that he admired the Marxists because they brought economic causation to the fore and because they sought patterns in history, but he had no time for their economic determinism.
4) The challenge presented by an ideas-based approach to both economic determinism and collective action theories merits intense scholarly attention, and Darden has done the field great service in setting the debate in motion.
Such statements sounded new to Chinese ears, because they accentuated politics rather than trumpeting the Communist Party's usual emphasis on economic determinism.
We seem to cling to an outdated economic determinism in trying to understand events in other societies and the motivations of their leaders.
His theoretical agenda contends that existing conceptualizations, centred on appeasement, revisionism, and "declinism," are inadequate because they rely too heavily on economic determinism.
As one of Morgan's later chapters makes clear, Christian educational literature of this time played an important role in a larger socialization process, in the process of producing citizens adapted to the class and gender roles that were demanded by the new economic order, and, although he stops well short of endorsing any form of an economic determinism, he leaves us with the suspicion that the shape of any given quest for order may owe more to unspoken historical necessities than to religious imagination or revelation.
Wright's use of the phrase "invent horror" ironically conveys the differences between 19th-century literary imagination and 20th-century social reality by implying that modern institutions exert far greater influence in socially constructing (or inventing) the horror of racism and economic determinism.
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