economic determinism

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economic determinism

n
(Sociology) a doctrine that states that all cultural, social, political, and intellectual activities are a product of the economic organization of society

economic determinism

The belief that all activities, such as cultural and political ones, arise from the economic organization of society.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beard first became an economic determinist, Drake details, when he was exposed to the influence of British anti-imperialist scholars.
The exact significance of this stress on politics in inflecting the Brennerite model is not indicated but its net effect is to soften the economic determinist logic of that approach.
No economic determinist, he argues the decisive factor is political, a clash between America's liberal-democratic goal of regime change in China versus the Chinese Communist Party's (CCP) determination to maintain its authoritarian rule.
The real Marx was not the economic determinist of the Preface, but the antimechanistic Hegelian of the Grundrisse who taught that the economic, political, and cultural dimensions of society interact and mutually determine each other.
He was an economic determinist, he gave technology a powerful role in historical change, he did think the state was where the bourgeoisie organised its executive committee, and he did think the class struggle was the motor of history.
It is a very interesting issue whether these and other economists advance their economic determinist theory because they are convinced that human beings are indeed so constituted as to be profit maximizers or because this approach to understanding people avoids all issues of ethics.
The version of the doctrine familiar to Li was the hard-line version of Marxism which emphasized the economic determinist aspect of Marx.
No economic determinist, he holds a particular place in his heart for the Whig Party (the book is dedicated to the memory of John Quincy Adams) and especially for the communications revolution brought about by the telegraph of Samuel Morse (whose biblically themed first telegram inspired the title).
Cabral, no crass economic determinist, states that culture is constituted by oral and written traditions, works of art, dance, cosmological ideas, music, religious beliefs, social structures, politics, and economics.
Horwitz, often labeled as an economic determinist, devoted considerable effort to deconstructing the mental universe of judges and legal intellectuals.
Van Leeuwen is hardly a crude economic determinist for he accounts for social factors such as perceptions of rank.
This certainly accords much better with the mentality of the English-speaking peoples from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries than the more familiar economic determinist models.
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