Edict of Nantes


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Related to Edict of Nantes: Peace of Westphalia

Edict of Nantes

n
(Historical Terms) the law granting religious and civil liberties to the French Protestants, promulgated by Henry IV in 1598 and revoked by Louis XIV in 1685
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They had been the settlers of thirteen separate and distinct English colonies, along the margin of the shore of the North American Continent; contiguously situated, but chartered by adventurers of characters variously diversified, including sectarians, religious and political, of all the classes which for the two preceding centuries had agitated and divided the people of the British islands--and with them were intermingled the descendants of Hollanders, Swedes, Germans, and French fugitives from the persecution of the revoker of the Edict of Nantes.
2m (PS190,000/€214,000) and Cape Derby winner Edict Of Nantes for a reported R9.
Your lucky year in which to revoke the Edict of Nantes is 1685.
Considering the Huguenots first in France and then in diaspora, they discuss such topics as doctrine and liturgy of the Reformed Churches of France, pastors and professors as shapers of Huguenot tradition, the revocation of the Edict of Nantes and the Desert, sociolinguistics of the Huguenot communities in German-speaking territories, and Huguenot congregations in colonial New York and Massachusetts: reassessing the paradigm of Anglican conformity.
The five sections of the book chronicle the history of the Huguenots from the first stirrings of the Reformation in Europe to the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes and its consequences.
Area Parking Place Of The Edict Of Nantes, Set Of Sports Ormeaux, School Of Alcide Orbigny, Skate Park, Park Activities Grand Place
In 1744, Huguenot silversmith Nicholas Sprimont, who had fled Liege following the revocation of the Edict of Nantes to settle in London, entered into a partnership with fellow Huguenot Charles Gouyn to produce fashionable porcelain for royal and aristocratic London society.
In 1685, King Louis XIV signed the Edict of Fontainebleau, revoking the Edict of Nantes that had established legal toleration of France's Protestant population, the Huguenots.
He was born in 1688, the son of a Huguenot forced to flee his French home in 1685 as a victim of the so-called Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
In this collection of essays, contributors from England, France, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Japan, South Africa, and the US provide new insight into the Huguenots in three contexts: their life in France before the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685; the great exodus from France and the search for new homes in Europe; and their contributions to the societies in which they settled.
Locke, for example, wrote Letter while in self-imposed exile in Holland where his earlier ideas on toleration were influenced by the Dutch Remonstrants and Louis XIV's revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
In the final years of the century there were many political twists and turns from which authors attempted to divine the likelihood of a sudden apocalypse or the millennium's imminence: the succession of James II; Monmouth's rebellion and of course the Glorious Revolution and even for some far sighted observers, the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.