Edward Gibbon


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Noun1.Edward Gibbon - English historian best known for his history of the Roman Empire (1737-1794)Edward Gibbon - English historian best known for his history of the Roman Empire (1737-1794)
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It was to him, writes Edward Gibbon, that 'the title of conqueror of Africa is more justly due.
1737: Edward Gibbon, English historian who wrote The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire, was born in London.
But maybe their experience with highly selected students--not just anybody can get into either Olin College or UIUC--reflects what Edward Gibbon wrote in Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire: "The power of instruction is seldom of much efficacy, except in those happy dispositions where it is almost superfluous.
LIKE HERODOTUS, THUCYDIDES, MONTAIGNE, and Proust, Edward Gibbon (1737-1794) was a one-book wonder.
Her book is studded with illumining remarks, observations, and depth analysis quotes by Roland Allen, Frederick Buechner, Edward Gibbon, Achilles Tatius, Thomas Cahill, Rodney Stark, John Milton, Erasmus of Rotterdam, Rufus Jones, John Bunyan, and Charles Spurgeon; as well as Tom Oden, Bonhoeffer, Tutu, and Christopher Hitchens.
The Coptic Church considers him a saint, and he still appears in some lists of current Roman Catholic saints, even though historian Edward Gibbon described him as far from saintly: "a bold, bad man, whose hands were alternately polluted with gold and with blood.
1737: Edward Gibbon, above, English historian who wrote The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire, was born in London.
In his Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Edward Gibbon labelled George "an odious priest," a crook chased out of Palestine for flogging iffy bacon to the troops.
Even Edward Gibbon in his masterful book, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, is of two minds on that subject.
of Groningen, the Netherlands) discusses the first three centuries of Christianity from the perspectives of three iconic figures in Christian historigraphy: Edward Gibbon (The History of the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire), Adolf von Harnak (Die Mission und Ausbreitung des Christentums, and Rodney Stark (The Rise of Christianity).
THE STORY: Claiming to have discovered a medieval manuscript among the papers of 18th-century English historian Edward Gibbon, Carr chronicles the last days of the magnificent mountaintop city of Broken in early medieval Germany.
But, as Edward Gibbon pointed out two centuries ago, the Roman Empire fell.