Edward IV


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Related to Edward IV: Edward III, Edward VI, Elizabeth Woodville

Edward IV

1442-1483.
King of England (1461-1470 and 1471-1483) who was crowned after leading the Yorkists to victory in the Wars of the Roses. In 1470 he was dethroned in a rebellion but won back the crown in a battle at Tewkesbury (1471).

Edward IV

n
(Biography) 1442–83, king of England (1461–70; 1471–83); son of Richard, duke of York. He defeated Henry VI in the Wars of the Roses and became king (1461). In 1470 Henry was restored to the throne, but Edward recovered the crown by his victory at Tewkesbury
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Noun1.Edward IV - King of England from 1461 to 1470 and from 1471 to 1483Edward IV - King of England from 1461 to 1470 and from 1471 to 1483; was dethroned in 1470 but regained the throne in 1471 by his victory at the battle of Tewkesbury (1442-1483)
References in classic literature ?
All that troubled him but little; and he gave a warm reception every evening to the wine of the royal vintage of Chaillot, without a suspicion that several flasks of that same wine (somewhat revised and corrected, it is true, by Doctor Coictier), cordially offered to Edward IV.
for instance, was marvellously served by his conscience after the putting away of the two children of Edward IV.
King Edward (we are not told which among the monarchs of that name, but, from his temper and habits, we may suppose Edward IV.
It is hoped that the ground-penetrating radar will confirm the grave of the 48-year-old daughter of Edward IV lies beneath the later tomb of a local merchant.
SIR - I agree with Adrian Jones (Letters, February 20), regarding the importance of the Battle of Edgcote, July 1469, when Welsh forces under the command of the Earl of Pembroke faced rebels from the North of England trying to depose the Yorkist King Edward IV in favour of the Earl of Warwick, the "King Maker".
During the Wars of the Roses, Northumberland was a battle-ground between the Yorkist and Lancastrian forces as Edward IV and Henry VI fought for control over the disputed land.
The father of 21 children, he was Earl Marshall of England and his youngest daughter Cicely was the mother of Edward IV and Richard III.
The plans for the proposed HS2 railway line from London to the Midlands reveal that it will ravage the site of the Battle of Edgcote, July 1469, when Welsh forces under the command of the Earl of Pembroke faced rebels from the North of England trying to depose the Yorkist King Edward IV in favour of the Earl of Warwick, the "King Maker".
The nine candidates standing for the Nuneaton and Bedworth seats are Emma Bowers (17), a student at King Edward IV College; Catherine Randle (12), a pupil at Manor Park Community School; Katie Baldwin (14), a pupil at Hartshill School; Liz Bush (16), a student at North Warwickshire and Hinckley College; and Jatinder Singh Burchu (16), Minda Singh (15), Emma Hobson, Samantha Broadaway (both 16) and Chris Hewitt (14), who are all pupils at Nicholas Chamberlaine Technology College in Bedworth.
A REGARDING D Thornton's answer to Sandra Stanton's question (Dear Mirror February 24), Edward II, Henry VI, Edward IV and Edward V were all, like Richard II, deposed, while in 1688 James II fled a coup led by William of Orange, left.
Historians argued at the inquiry that the Battle of Tewkesbury, in which Lancastrian resurgents under exiled Queen Margaret were defeated by Yorkist King Edward IV, was a turning point in English history, leading to fundamental changes in monarchy and government.