efficient cause


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Related to efficient cause: Final cause, Formal cause, Material cause

efficient cause

n
(Philosophy) philosophy that which produces an effect by a causal process. Compare final cause See also cause7
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper argues that Aristotle's account of voluntary action focuses on the conditions under which one is the efficient cause of one's actions qua individual.
In Article 9, On the Author or Efficient Cause of Theology, Henry asks whether the same author is responsible for the two Testaments, and on whose authority we ought to believe them (answers: yes to the first, God's alone to the second).
Goal certainly seems to have final cause about it, and motive accords with the movement aspect of efficient cause (I mean that which moves the maker to set things in motion, that which propels one into action).
The more ancient path to knowledge works its way through rhetoric, and various people trained in rhetoric raise questions about effects: not just the effects from efficient cause, but the more profound effects stemming from formal and final cause.
enhances analogy, discontinuity, obsolesces isolated figures, connection, efficient cause, retrieves ground patterns, irrationality, formal cause, and, if distorted, reverses into determinism.
On the reading I will advance, the antecedent of "this" is "the potential sphere being actually a sphere", and only one cause is needed--the efficient cause of the craftsman.
The articles from the Summa that he translates and introduces here explore theology as a science in itself, theology in relation to the other sciences, the final causes of theology, the author or efficient cause of theology, and the authority of sacred scripture.
Whereas the "Causal" theory designates a certain psychological feature as the efficient cause of intentional actions, the Anscombean view holds that the relevant factor is the formal cause of the action.
Benedict Ashley and Albert Moraczewski, studying Aquinas' embryological principles, maintain that "it is the nucleus of the zygote produced by the fertilization of the human ovum by a human sperm" that is the formal and efficient cause of developing human entity ("Cloning, Aquinas, and the Embryonic Person," National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly, Summer 2001).
Moreover, the Calvinist accusation that the Catholic doctrine of ex opera operato is magical and Deistic is founded on a misconstrual of Catholic teaching: the principle of ex opera operato expresses the instrumental causality of the sacramental rite, but the efficient cause remains the Holy Spirt.
Ibn Sina, like Aristotle, (1) recognizes four kinds of causes, or rather four modes of explanation in the study of nature: (1) the efficient cause ('illah fa'iliyyah), namely, that which causes a thing to move or change and hence is dubbed the source or principle of motion and change (mabda' al-harakah); (2) the material cause ('illah 'unsuriyyah), defined as that out of which a thing is generated, that in which change or motion is produced, and that which persists before, during, and after the process of change; (3) the formal cause ('illah suriyyah), that is, that into which something is changed or moved; this is the essence or 'what it was for so-and-so to be' of a thing; and (4) the final cause ('illah gha'iyyah), or that for the sake of which a change or motion is produced.
In the light of the following passage, however, Gill suggests that it is an agent or an efficient cause that ultimately imposes a goal-directedness or an intrinsic direction upon a change by transmitting a form to the patient:

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