Elamite

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E·la·mite

 (ē′lə-mīt′)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Elam.
2. The language of the ancient Elamites, of no known linguistic affiliation.

Elamite

(ˈiːləˌmaɪt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) an inhabitant of the ancient kingdom of Elam
2. (Languages) Also called: Elamitic or Susian the extinct language of this people, of no known relationship, recorded in cuneiform inscriptions dating from the 25th to the 4th centuries bc
3. (Historical Terms) Also called: Elamitic or Susian the extinct language of this people, of no known relationship, recorded in cuneiform inscriptions dating from the 25th to the 4th centuries bc
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to Elam, its people, or their language

E•lam•ite

(ˈi ləˌmaɪt)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of ancient Elam.
2. the extinct languageof the Elamites, known principally from texts written in a cuneiform syllabary between the 13th and 5th centuries b.c.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Elam, its people, or their language.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Elamite - a member of an ancient warlike people living in Elam east of Babylonia as early as 3000 BCElamite - a member of an ancient warlike people living in Elam east of Babylonia as early as 3000 BC
Caucasian, White, White person - a member of the Caucasoid race
2.Elamite - an extinct ancient language of unknown affinitiesElamite - an extinct ancient language of unknown affinities; spoken by the Elamites
natural language, tongue - a human written or spoken language used by a community; opposed to e.g. a computer language
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the chromogram fails to capture other features of the Naram-Sin treaty equally relevant to the discussion: The text, found at Susa, is written in the Elamite language and "the appeal to the gods enumerates more than 35 deities who constitute almost all the deities of the Elamite pantheon" (Altman 2012: 35); yet "[t]he superb writing and the careful spelling of the Elamite [treaty] mark the tablet as a product of the royal chancellery at Akkade, and no doubt an Akkadian version is waiting to be excavated there" (Westenholz 1999: 92).
3 The best, and readily available, overview of the Elamite language is Stolper (2004), which summarizes and cites all of the sources.
He was able to confirm this development by comparing the Manding and the Elamite languages, and the Sumerian and Dravidian languages.