elastomer

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e·las·to·mer

 (ĭ-lăs′tə-mər)
n.
Any of various polymers having the elastic properties of natural rubber.


e·las′to·mer′ic (-mĕr′ĭk) adj.

elastomer

(ɪˈlæstəmə)
n
(Chemistry) any material, such as natural or synthetic rubber, that is able to resume its original shape when a deforming force is removed
[C20: from elastic + -mer]
elastomeric adj

e•las•to•mer

(ɪˈlæs tə mər)

n.
an elastic substance occurring naturally, as natural rubber, or produced synthetically, as butyl rubber.
[1935–40; elast (ic) + -o- + -mer]
e•las`to•mer′ic (-ˈmɛr ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elastomer - any of various elastic materials that resemble rubber (resumes its original shape when a deforming force is removed)
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Key statement: Elastomer composition having a self-sealing property which can be used in particular as a puncture-resistant layer in an inflatable article, based on at least (phr meaning parts by weight per 100 parts of solid elastomer): a blend of at least two solid elastomers, a polybutadiene or butadiene copolymer elastomer, referred to as "elastomer A" and a natural rubber or synthetic polyisoprene elastomer, referred to as "elastomer B," the elastomer A:elastomer B ratio by weight being within a range from 10:90 to 90:10; between 30 and 90 phr of a hydrocarbon resin; from 0 to less than 30 phr of filler.
If so, you may like to read a recent roadmap regarding UK Elastomers, published by the Polymer Group within the KTN's Materials Community.
Airthane TDI PUR prepolymers for castable elastomers.
DuPont will purchase The Dow Chemical Company's remaining equity interest in the companies' joint venture DuPont Dow Elastomers (DDE) for $87 million once Dow exercises an option to acquire certain assets of the company.
Thus, most elastomers are swellable but not "wettable," says Isao Noda, a polymer scientist with Procter & Gamble in Cinnati.
A newly revised product guide highlights this developer and supplier of innovative polymers, including synthetic elastomers and specialty chemicals.
is lauded as a breakthrough in olefinic thermoplastic elastomers due to a unique block structure, which reportedly delivers novel combinations of end-use properties and processability at a "cost-in-use" competitive with materials such as TPVs, TPUs, and styrenic block-copolymer (SBC) TPEs.
Conventional elastomer composites and the solid-state mixing process Inorganic fillers are added to elastomers to provide reinforcement and strength.
Developed by Bayer MaterialScience LLC to meet the increased global demand for high-quality ophthalmic products, the patented technology can make elastomers from extremely hard to very soft.