Eleanor of Castile


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Eleanor of Castile

1246?-1290.
Queen of England (1274-1290) as the wife of Edward I, whom she accompanied on a crusade (1270-1273).

Eleanor of Castile

(ˈɛlɪnə; -ˌnɔː)
n
(Biography) 1246–90, Spanish wife of Edward I of England. Eleanor Crosses were erected at each place at which her body rested between Nottingham, where she died, and London, where she is buried
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sledmere's Eleanor Cross was built in the 1890s and is a copy of 12 erected in the late 13th century in honour of King Edward I's first wife, Eleanor of Castile.
In this study, Margaret Bent challenges the long-accepted attribution of the Speculum to Jacobus Leodiensis (Jacques de Liege) and proposes an alternative author, Jacobus de Ispania, a nephew of Eleanor of Castile, queen consort of Edward I of England.
This is a replica of a memorial cross built in honor of Queen Eleanor of Castile on the instructions of her husband, King Edward I.
The Life of Eleanor of Castile exhibition showcases the eight phases of Edward I's wife's life through a Victorianstyle carousel.
Pous, "Los dos matrimonial," 67; Parsons, Eleanor of Castile, 48; Ballesteros Beretta, Alfonso X, 1047
Then, with aplomb, he describes how Edward I's wife, Eleanor of Castile, and his two chancellors, Thomas Merton and Robert Burnell, all hugely enriched themselves by taking over properties encumbered by Jewish debts right up to and beyond 1275, when Jews were forbidden to engage in usury.
A sampling: speech and writing in the Gospels of Matilda of Canossa, the manipulation of devotional technologies, the miracles of the crib at Greccio, reflections on a poor sinner's cross in Heilbronn (1514), Eleanor of Castile and the New Jerusalem , and church treasures and political claims in the Mark Brandenburg.
The light and refreshing sangria has been specially created in celebration of Eleanor's cross, which is located just outside of Charing Cross Hotel and is one of twelve landmarks built to mark the points where the funeral procession of Eleanor of Castile stopped.