Socratic method

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Socratic method

n.
A pedagogical technique in which a teacher does not give information directly but instead asks a series of questions, with the result that the student comes either to the desired knowledge by answering the questions or to a deeper awareness of the limits of knowledge.

Socratic method

n
(Philosophy) philosophy the method of instruction by question and answer used by Socrates in order to elicit from his pupils truths he considered to be implicitly known by all rational beings. Compare maieutic

Socrat′ic meth′od


n.
the use of questions, as employed by Socrates, to develop a latent idea in the mind of a student or elicit an admission from an opponent.
[1735–45]

Socratic method

- A teaching technique in which a teacher does not give information directly but instead asks a series of questions, with the result that the student comes either to the desired knowledge by answering the questions or to a deeper awareness of the limits of knowledge.
See also related terms for teacher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Socratic method - a method of teaching by question and answerSocratic method - a method of teaching by question and answer; used by Socrates to elicit truths from his students
pedagogics, pedagogy, teaching method - the principles and methods of instruction
References in periodicals archive ?
Mansfeld, Heresiography in Context: Hippolytus' Elenchos as a Source for Greek Philosophy (Brill, Leiden, 1992) 330; for analysis in Galen see M.
Pseudo-Alejandro (1898): Alexandri quod feretur in Aristotelis Sohisticos Elenchos commentarium, ed.
25, et <<L'homonoia selon Antiphon d'Athenes>>, Elenchos, 22, 2001, 243-246.
A proposito del alcance de las interpretaciones funcionalistas de la psicologia aristotelica y del caracter causal del alma", Elenchos.
Piccone y de proxima publicacion en la Coleccion Elenchos de la editorial Bibliopolis de Napoles.
In the first book of the Republic, for instance, Thrasymachus' loses his temper in response to Socrates' evasive and agnostic elenchos (Resp.
1988): "Il Timeo, unita del dialogo, verosimiglianza del discorso", en Elenchos (fase.
So, Socrates' response at the end of this elenchos is not surprising: 'Then you did not answer what I asked, surprising man.
Nilsson MCML:561-562, Quispel 1981: 417), in der Naassenerpredigt" (Hippolyt, Elenchos V, 92, 28: teleios anthropos, 86, 7 f.
Kindstrand, 'Diogenes Laertius and the chreia tradition', Elenchos 7 (1986) 232.
This editor he call the El (after Elenchos = Refutation) redactor.