Elizabethan


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Related to Elizabethan: Elizabethan sonnet, Elizabethan English

E·liz·a·be·than

 (ĭ-lĭz′ə-bē′thən, -bĕth′ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of Elizabeth I of England or her reign.

E·liz′a·be′than n.

Elizabethan

(ɪˌlɪzəˈbiːθən)
adj
1. (Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to England or its culture in the age of Elizabeth I or to the United Kingdom or its culture in the age of Elizabeth II
2. (Architecture) of, relating to, or designating a style of architecture used in England during the reign of Elizabeth I, characterized by moulded and sculptured ornament based on German and Flemish models
n
(Historical Terms) a person who lived in England during the reign of Elizabeth I

E•liz•a•be•than

(ɪˌlɪz əˈbi θən, -ˈbɛθ ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the reign of Elizabeth I, queen of England, or to her times: Elizabethan drama.
n.
2. a person who lived in England during the Elizabethan period, esp. a poet or dramatist.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Elizabethan - a person who lived during the reign of Elizabeth IElizabethan - a person who lived during the reign of Elizabeth I; "William Shakespeare was an Elizabethan"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.Elizabethan - of or relating to Elizabeth I of England or to the age in which she ruled as queen; "Elizabethan music"
Translations
alžbětinský

Elizabethan

[ɪˌlɪzəˈbiːθən]
A. ADJisabelino
B. Nisabelino/a m/f

Elizabethan

[ɪˌlɪzəˈbiːθən] adjélisabéthain(e)

Elizabethan

nElisabethaner(in) m(f)

Elizabethan

[ɪˌlɪzəˈbiːθn] adj & nelisabettiano/a
References in classic literature ?
William Rodney, upon the Elizabethan use of metaphor.
In undertaking to speak of the Elizabethan use of metaphor in poetry--"
He heard Fanshaw add that his country was full of such quaint fables and idioms; it was the very home of romance; he even pitted this part of Cornwall against Devonshire, as a claimant to the laurels of Elizabethan seamanship.
The piece of information that died within him was to the effect that three hundred years ago five Elizabethan barques had anchored where the
Elizabethan prose, all too chaotic in the beauty and force which overflowed into it from Elizabethan poetry, and incorrect with an incorrectness which leaves it scarcely legitimate prose at all: then, in reaction against that, the correctness of Dryden, and his followers through the eighteenth century, determining the standard of a prose in the proper sense, not inferior to the prose of the Augustan age in Latin, or of the "great age in France": and, again in reaction against this, the wild mixture of poetry and prose, in our wild nineteenth century, under the influence of such writers as Dickens and Carlyle: such are the three periods into which the story of our prose literature divides itself.
But soon there came another great Elizabethan to share his loneliness.
At the other side of the room, further forward, is an Elizabethan chair roughly carved in the taste of Inigo Jones.
The Renaissance and the Elizabethan Period, about 1500 to 1603.
She led the way into the inhabited side of the house, ascended the stairs, and opened with her key the door at the end of the passage, which communicated with the old Elizabethan rooms--a door never previously used, in my time, at Blackwater Park.
He had never before seen a woman's lips and teeth which forced upon his mind with such persistent iteration the old Elizabethan simile of roses filled with snow.
Near the top of this hill, about two miles from Linden-Car, stood Wildfell Hall, a superannuated mansion of the Elizabethan era, built of dark grey stone, venerable and picturesque to look at, but doubtless, cold and gloomy enough to inhabit, with its thick stone mullions and little latticed panes, its time-eaten air-holes, and its too lonely, too unsheltered situation, - only shielded from the war of wind and weather by a group of Scotch firs, themselves half blighted with storms, and looking as stern and gloomy as the Hall itself.
He would have ruffled bravely with our Elizabethans, and for a Chinese is strangely warlike in sentiment.

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