Ellis


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Related to Ellis: Ellis Island

Ellis

(ˈɛlɪs)
n
1. (Biography) Alexander John. 1814–90, English philologist: made the first systematic survey of the phonology of British dialects
2. (Biography) (Henry) Havelock (ˈhævlɒk). 1859–1939, English essayist: author of works on the psychology of sex

El•lis

(ˈɛl ɪs)

n.
(Henry) Havelock, 1859–1939, English psychologist and writer.
References in classic literature ?
An anecdote mentioned by Ellis shows how much they feel at home in this element.
Respecting the author's identity, I would have it to he distinctly understood that Acton Bell is neither Currer nor Ellis Bell, and therefore let not his faults be attributed to them.
Ellis and Sir Charles Wheatstone, who did far more than they ever knew to forward Bell in the direction of the telephone.
So it happened that when Bell ran to Ellis as a young enthusiast and told his experiments, Ellis informed him that Helmholtz had done the same things several years before and done them more completely.
Ellis was still a living patriarch, with an impressive head always covered by a velvet skull cap, for which he would apologize to public meetings in a very courtly manner.
Ellis, 1776, 1778, 1888 (Morley's Universal Library), 1893 (Lubbock's Hundred Books); by E.
Ellis, in his 'Polynesian Researches', gives some interesting accounts of the abortive attempts made by the ''Tahiti Mission'' to establish a branch Mission upon certain islands of the group.
Ellis at the Limes, with whom it remained till seven; then it was taken to Miss Brooks at the Manor House, who, since she got it late, had the advantage of keeping it.
It will be much the best place for her, so near Miss Lee, and not far from the girls, and close by the housemaids, who could either of them help to dress her, you know, and take care of her clothes, for I suppose you would not think it fair to expect Ellis to wait on her as well as the others.
Yet Horace Walpole wrote a goblin tale which has thrilled through many a bosom; and George Ellis could transfer all the playful fascination of a humour, as delightful as it was uncommon, into his Abridgement of the Ancient Metrical Romances.
Now what could Captain Ellis, the Master Attendant, want to write to the Steward for?