Elohim


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El·o·him

 (ĕl′ō-hēm′, -hĭm′, ə-lō′hĭm)
n.
A name for God in the Hebrew Scriptures.

[Hebrew 'ĕlōhîm, pl. of 'ĕlōah, god; see ʔl in Semitic roots.]

Elohim

(ɛˈləʊhɪm; ˌɛləʊˈhiːm)
n
(Bible) Old Testament a Hebrew word for God or gods
[C17: from Hebrew 'Elōhim, plural (used to indicate uniqueness) of 'Elōah God; probably related to 'El God]

E•lo•him

(ˌɛl oʊˈhim, -ˈhɪm)

n.
God, esp. as used in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament.
[< Hebrew]
El`o•him′ic (-ˈhɪm ɪk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
The name Elohim, which is the name of God to the Jews, was mentioned 33 times [in the Bible]," (https://www.
The Embassy was supported by volunteers from several Filipino community organizations in North Rhine-Westphalia, namely, the Sacred Heart of Jesus Group - Bonn, Tropa ng Kabataang Pinoy, Siegburg Community, Elohim Catholic Charismatic Community and The Loved Flock Community - Bonn.
Throughout the entire narrative of Noah, God is referred to as Elohim.
Charleston's fire of 1838 burned approximately a quarter of the city, destroying a district of 150 acres and more than 1,100 buildings, including the first Beth Elohim synagogue, which was erected in 1794.
More detours, more dryness, more shame, and finally--a son, Isaac, Elohim fulfilled the promised blessing.
This autumn, with politics on everyone's mind, Brooklyn's Congregation Beth Elohim (CBE) decided to do something a little different for Sukkot.
In this closing section of the novel, a triad of artists, creators, and writers triggers the reader's epiphany: Ehecatl, Elohim, and Anne Frank call on us to remember, and to name the past for what it really was.
Among the topics are the revisionist visionary, the nameless initiates, initiation: the astral plane, irreconcilable worlds and monstrous birth in 20th-century literature, the Luciferian Doctrine, the esoteric doctrine of live, the birth of the Ruach Elohim, and black Helen and dark Achilles.
analyzes the scriptural term tselem elohim ("divine image," cf.
By allying the gods of Sumer, Babylon, Islam, Phrygia, and Iran with Yahweh, Elohim, and Jesus, the text skates on treacherous ice among fundamentalist readers, parents, and librarians.