Emancipation Proclamation


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Related to Emancipation Proclamation: 13th Amendment

Emancipation Proclamation

Lincoln’s statement affirming the abolition of slavery as a war aim (1862). 4 million slaves were automatically freed (1863).
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I cannot remember having slept in a bed until after our family was declared free by the Emancipation Proclamation.
Notwithstanding that the Emancipation Proclamation freed him from any obligation to his master, this black man walked the greater portion of the distance back to where his old master lived in Virginia, and placed the last dollar, with interest, in his hands.
The most distinct thing that I now recall in connection with the scene was that some man who seemed to be a stranger (a United States officer, I presume) made a little speech and then read a rather long paper--the Emancipation Proclamation, I think.
This month, two seminal documents in American historythe Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment to the Constitutionwent on display (link is external) at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC).
One of his remarkable achievements include issuing the Emancipation Proclamation that declared all slaves should be freed.
When Americans consider how slavery was abolished in the United States, they usually credit one person, President Abraham Lincoln, and one act, his Emancipation Proclamation.
Which American president issued the Emancipation Proclamation that freed slaves in the rebellious southern States?
I strenuously disagree with Guelzo when he asserts that the Emancipation Proclamation came first, with "the flight from slavery following.
This week (July 22) in 1862 President Abraham Lincoln shared with his Cabinet a draft of what became the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared that 3 million slaves would "thenceforward, and forever, be free.
The traveling exhibition is composed of informative panels featuring photographic reproductions of original documents, including a draft of Lincoln's first inaugural address, the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment.
He famously referred to the nation's founding documents and the Emancipation Proclamation and also quoted this bit from Isaiah 40:
In this book, Holzer, senior vice president of external affairs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, revisits the Emancipation Proclamation, a document seen as uninspired by generations following its creation.