emergency contraception

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emergency contraception

n.
Measures taken to reduce the risk of pregnancy within a few days after sexual intercourse during which contraceptives failed or were not used. Forms of emergency contraception include oral drugs such as levonorgestrel and insertion of a copper intrauterine device.
References in periodicals archive ?
The machine stocks pharmacy items such as the Plan B emergency contraception pill and pregnancy tests.
Minister Dalli referred to the recent issue concerning the emergency contraception pill which was put on the national agenda by a voluntary organisation for womens rights and which resulted in the provision of this pill.
Under the Plan B scheme, women can call into participating pharmacies and ask for the emergency contraception pill, which can be taken up to 72 hours after unprotected sex.
Emergency Contraception Pill (ECP) has been technically available since 1960's through off label in most of countries.
The fact is, however, that the current dedicated emergency contraception pill is a progestogen, a hormone that induces changes in the endometrium necessary for the maintenance of pregnancy.
She reported having felt that the pharmacist was thinking: "Oh you're another one of those who don't use a condom, and now you might have a baby, and you have to come and get your emergency contraception pill, and you're not being safe.
The FDA has approved one emergency contraception pill called Plan B, which contains the progestin levonorgestrel.
Dorothy Clarke, manager of the British Pregnancy Advice Service, said: "We want to make sure people know a potential pregnancy can be avoided if the emergency contraception pill is taken up to 72 hours after unprotected sex.
They'll be able to walk straight off their flights and into the NHS clinic to pick up and take the emergency contraception pill, which works up to 72 hours after sex.
Even as scientists fine-tune the emergency contraception pill, the misnomer attached to Yuzpe's discovery still stands as a classic in medical science.
In 2011, the FDA determined that girls younger than 16 could safely and properly use the emergency contraception pill without supervision.

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