emigrational

emigrational

(ˌɛmɪˈɡreɪʃənəl)
adj
(Peoples) relating to emigration
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite this limitation the fact that the urban and peri-urban groups of the population is multi-cultural with residents emanating from across all the three regions due to emigrational trends and urbanization might have consolidated the attitudinal diversity with respect to HIV/AIDS and VCT.
Not discussing these threads well-identified in the Polish literary studies, I shall end these architectural-literary analyses with a quotation from a text highly significant in this view, Dwa miasta [Two cities]ofAdam Zagajewski, in which the lost matter of Lviv touches upon the alien matter of Gliwice, and where the childhood spatial experience and the emigrational spatial experience of the adult writer overlap: "[.
Born in Cuba but raised in the United States, Pilar is torn between the competing and contradictory voices of her emigrational legacy, with her estranged mother and her geographically remote grandmother representing the two major components of her identity.
On both the east and west coasts, he says, there were major emigrational events about 16,000 years ago, and the bipoint was part of it.
Also, the youth is tired of protesting and is taking "changing the nation" in an emigrational sense.
2008) findings, while smaller size observed with non-users of microcredit (mean family size is 7) could be attributed to emigrational effect in search of other sources of income as a way of taking care of their credit needs, due probably to their inability to access credit facility.
Apart from the colonial history, the emigrational patterns of the people of Africa from one region to another also contribute to the diversity of Africa.
30) Sune Akerman, "Towards an Understanding of Emigrational Processes," Scandinavian Journal of History 3 (1978): 131-54.
wherever imperial, colonial or emigrational drives may have scattered