emigrationist

emigrationist

(ˌɛmɪˈɡreɪʃənɪst)
n
(Peoples) a person who promotes emigration
References in periodicals archive ?
23) The novel's emigrationist politics may have been "out of step" (Levine 1997, 189-90) with the concerns of the war effort.
By the mid-1850s, the two had become leaders of opposing ideological movements represented by two national conventions: an integrationist one led by Douglass held in Rochester, New York, in 1853, and an emigrationist one led by Delany held in Cleveland, Ohio, the following year.
James (history, UC-Irvine) presents the first biographical portrait of educator, abolitionist, editor, government official, emigrationist, and colonizationist Russwurm--one of the first African Americans to receive a university education and co-founder of America's first newspaper owned, operated, and edited by African Americans.
Echoing the thinking of his friend and fellow emigrationist Martin Delany, Whitfield forwarded the notion that it was these very same enslaved black bodies that had created and ensured the existence of America as a "free" nation by physically and materially building up that nation, a fact which prompts Whitfield to construct a poetry, as Whitley puts it, that "functions on the .
Toward the end of the 1840s, Shadd and his daughter turned their attention to the emigrationist movement.
Hence, his connections to the new republic in Haiti, his cooperation with black emigrationist and ship captain Paul Cuffee, his opposition to the international slave trade, and his ties to Morris Brown, Denmark Vesey, and other Charleston blacks whose incubated insurrection against slavery in AME meetings demonstrate the wide reach of Allen's Atlantic World involvements.
We cannot separate Delany's life or work into distinct periods of insurrectionary thought and emigrationist thought.
The seeds of Black Nationalism, sowed more a century before by leaders like Martin Delany, a militant black emigrationist who promised a country back in Africa for all black Americans, were nurtured by separatist and fundamentalist leaders over generations.
Hahn was, in many ways, typical of the emigrationist colonialist.
Little's eloquence supports both the Canadian vision of our moral supremacy over the United States, but also the aspirations of emigrationist African Americans to locate a new and comfortable homeland.
His stated objective, to observe and interpret emigrationist cultural and spiritual meanings, in both private thought and public debate, is thus achieved.