emotional intelligence

(redirected from Emotional knowledge)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to Emotional knowledge: emotional intelligence

emotional intelligence

n.
Intelligence regarding the emotions, especially in the ability to monitor one's own or others' emotions.

emotional intelligence

n
(Psychology) awareness of one's own emotions and moods and those of others, esp in managing people
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Mayer and Salovey (1997) emotional intelligence is the ability to perceive emotions to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional knowledge, and to reflectively regulate emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth.
These agents of change spur us to action through mindfulness of their own emotions, compassion, and ability to use emotional knowledge in practice.
Salovey and Pizarro (as cited in Crowne, 2009) define El as "the ability to perceive and express emotion accurately and adaptively, the ability to understand emotion and emotional knowledge, the ability to use feelings to facilitate thought, and the ability to regulate emotions in oneself and in others" (p.
Bratianu presents students, instructors, researchers, and professionals working in a wide-variety of contexts with an investigation of organizational knowledge as it is composed of cognitive knowledge, emotional knowledge, and spiritual knowledge.
For such a project to make a real social impact -- to enable the building of a substantial base of emotional knowledge encompassing, for example, an understanding of the depth of feeling experienced by African Americans at tragedies such as Ferguson -- individual conversations need to be catalyzed millions of times.
Emotional intelligence involves the capacity to accomplish faithful analysis about emotions and the capacity to employ feelings, emotions, and emotional knowledge to augment thought, incorporating particular expertise and suggesting that this distinctive expertise may also be considered as constituting a unified, general emotional intelligence.
Later, when she encounters a country woman who is desperate to evade enforcers of the one-child policy, Bao has emotional knowledge of what is at stake, something her younger self could not have comprehended.
Quoting from a study, he said emotional intelligence "includes the abilities to accurately perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional knowledge, and to reflectively regulate emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth.
Mayer and Salovey (1997) have defined emotional intelligence as the ability for accurate understanding, evaluation and expression of emotions, ability for access or creation of feelings, ability for understanding emotions and emotional knowledge and ability of adjusting emotions for promotion of emotions growth and intelligence [2].
Emotional knowledge has a different nature then cognitive knowledge and thus it does not fit into the Newtonian dynamics paradigm used in the above-discussed metaphors.
When making the step to professional sports, the athlete already possesses explicit, tacit, cognitive and emotional knowledge.
Emotional knowledge, skills, and intelligence hold a major key to improving education and helping students, teachers, faculty, and student development professionals attain higher degrees of achievement, career success, leadership, and personal well-being.