Empedocles

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Em·ped·o·cles

 (ĕm-pĕd′ə-klēz′) Fifth century bc.
Greek philosopher who believed that all matter is composed of earth, air, fire and water, and that all change is caused by attraction and repulsion.

Empedocles

(ɛmˈpɛdəˌkliːz)
n
(Biography) ?490–430 bc, Greek philosopher and scientist, who held that the world is composed of four elements, air, fire, earth, and water, which are governed by the opposing forces of love and discord

Em•ped•o•cles

(ɛmˈpɛd əˌkliz)

n.
c490–c430 B.C., Greek philosopher and statesman.
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Noun1.Empedocles - Greek philosopher who taught that all matter is composed of particles of fire and water and air and earth (fifth century BC)
Translations

Empedocles

[ɛmˈpɛdəˌkliːz] nEmpedocle m
References in periodicals archive ?
Aristotle had mentioned 'aether' [37] in his recapitulations of older doctrines that had been taught by Anaxagoras, who had imagined aether as fire, and Empedokles, who had imagined aether as air [1].
In fragmentary philosophical letters, Holderlin argues that subjects know theoretically that they live in a "mehr als mechanische[r] Zusammenhang" with an absolute (14: 46); the tragic character Empedokles attempts to unite "die gewaltigen Extremen" of his era (13: 873).
So it comes as no surprise that the ideas of Empedokles and Plato influenced Freud's psychoanalytical theory.
Both Lefteris Empedokles, secretary general at Larnaca Municipality and an official in charge of weddings at the Nicosia Municipality, pointed out that the majority of couples are foreign.
Like the legendary Empedokles, to whom this passage alludes, Poe's fictional observer has to embrace death in order to experience the universe in its oneness.
Empedokles (Chapter 6) is exposed as 'die Abbreviatur fur Holderlins Interpretation der Zeitgeschichte als Experimentalsituation' (p.
But Goethe and Schiller, who had defined their own realm of influence in what is nowadays thought of as classical Weimar, were not fond of the young poet, of his pronounced enthusiasm for eccentric ancient Greeks like Empedokles or Hyperion, of his patriotic exuberance, his hymnic eloquence.
For example, Empedokles finds his authenticity by comprehending his circumstances and consequently by voluntarily going to his death.
15 (= DK A 95): Empedokles tas hedonas gignesthai .
glosses as [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], is used by Empedokles (DK 31 B 27.