Heraclius

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Related to Emperor Heraclius: Heraclius the younger

Her·a·cli·us

 (hĕr′ə-klī′əs, hĭ-răk′lē-) 575?-641.
Emperor of the Byzantine Empire (610-641) who captured Syria, Palestine, and Egypt from Persia (613-628) but lost them all to an army of Muslim Arabs (635-641).

Heraclius

(hɛˈræklɪəs)
n
(Biography) ?575–641 ad, Byzantine emperor, who restored the Holy Cross to Jerusalem (629)

Her•a•cli•us

(ˌhɛr əˈklaɪ əs, hɪˈræk li əs)

n.
A.D. 575?–641, Byzantine emperor 610–641.
References in classic literature ?
And if truth to life is the main thing the drama should keep in view, how is it possible for any average understanding to be satisfied when the action is supposed to pass in the time of King Pepin or Charlemagne, and the principal personage in it they represent to be the Emperor Heraclius who entered Jerusalem with the cross and won the Holy Sepulchre, like Godfrey of Bouillon, there being years innumerable between the one and the other?
Muslim general Khalid bin Waleed had defeated the Byzantine Empire in the battle of Yarmuk, utterly routing the forces of Emperor Heraclius.
Back in the seventh century the Emperor Heraclius uttered a famous lament when retreating from this plain across the Taurus Mountains near Tarsus: "Peace unto thee, O Syria, and what an excellent country this is for the enemy.
The Patriarchate in Jerusalem has had a strong relationship with the Arab and Islamic world ever since the Arab Caliph Omar Ibn Al Khattab conquered Jerusalem in 636, when he received the keys of the Holy City from Patriarch Sephronius of Jerusalem because the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius had already left the city for Constantinople," Patriarch Theophilos said.
The fall of Rome is based on the myth of the Emperor Heraclius and a letter that he would have written to Muhammad, recognizing him as "the messenger of God,"
He explores the roots of the some of the crucial elements of a religio-political program instituted by Byzantine emperor Heraclius in response to the Persian conquest of Jerusalem in 614, and the percussions for Byzantine political theology and Christian ideology of warfare.
Sixteen years later, the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius recaptured Jerusalem and what was believed to be the True Cross and restored it to a newly rebuilt church.
After a long siege, and having received no support from Emperor Heraclius, in the winter of 637-638, he decided to surrender the city to the Arabs.
The coins bear the image of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius, who ruled between 610 and 641 A.
Following the general withdrawal of the Roman troops during the reign of Emperor Heraclius, the area seems to have experienced a sharp demographic decline.
Defeating the Persian forces, the charismatic emperor Heraclius articulated the enduring Byzantine conviction that God ordained the rule of the emperor to guard Orthodox Christianity.