empiricism

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Related to Empirical science: empirically, empiricism, Empirical observation

em·pir·i·cism

 (ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

(ɛmˈpɪrɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that all knowledge of matters of fact derives from experience and that the mind is not furnished with a set of concepts in advance of experience. Compare intuitionism, rationalism
2. the use of empirical methods
3. (Medicine) medical quackery; charlatanism
emˈpiricist n, adj

em•pir•i•cism

(ɛmˈpɪr əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. empirical method or practice.
2. the philosophic doctrine that all knowledge is derived from sense experience. Compare rationalism (def. 2).
3. undue reliance upon experience, as in medicine; quackery.
4. a conclusion that is arrived at empirically.
[1650–60]
em•pir′i•cist, n., adj.

empiricism

1. the doctrine that all ideas and categories are derived from sense experience and that knowledge cannot extend beyond experience, including observation, experiment, and induction.
2. an empirical method or practice. — empiricist, n.empirical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
a system of acquiring knowledge that rejects all o priori knowledge and relies solely upon observation, experimentation, and induction. Also empirism. — empiricist, n., adj. — empiric, empirical, adj.
See also: Knowledge

empiricism

The view that knowledge proceeds from experience.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.empiricism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge derives from experience
British empiricism - the predominant philosophical tradition in Great Britain since the 17th century
experimentalism - an empirical doctrine that advocates experimental principles
logical positivism, positivism - the form of empiricism that bases all knowledge on perceptual experience (not on intuition or revelation)
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.empiricism - the application of empirical methods in any art or science
investigating, investigation - the work of inquiring into something thoroughly and systematically
3.empiricism - medical practice and advice based on observation and experience in ignorance of scientific findings
medical practice - the practice of medicine
Translations

empiricism

[emˈpɪrɪsɪzəm] Nempirismo m

empiricism

[ɪmˈpɪrɪsɪzəm] nempirisme m

empiricism

nEmpirismus m; (method) → Empirie f

empiricism

[ɛmˈpɪrɪˌsɪzm] nempirismo
References in classic literature ?
He was not so much interested in surgery as in medicine, which, a more empirical science, offered greater scope to the imagination.
The Weberian (hierarchical) difference between facts and values is one of them, and it refers to one period in the history of metaphysics, which made empirical science possible by placing the Subject above the Object.
It takes empirical science, experimentation, and clinical trialing to develop, test, and produce safe and effective immunizations to benefit the public against existing and emerging threats.
However, the fact remains that refraction is still an art rather than just an empirical science and this is what sets it apart from all other procedures with the human touch still playing a critical part.
In 1929-30, Heidegger makes a unique approach to the question of ontology precisely by addressing it in the terms which are perhaps of most interest to us today: he attempts to think the destiny of being and metaphysics by investigating the relation between transcendental philosophy and empirical science.
It will become clear that mathematical inferentialism secures the objectivity of mathematics and explains the successful use of mathematics in empirical science without postulating the existence of the abstract world.
In recent years, many well-known scholars have argued that social science has mowed away from the basics of empirical science and lost its power to answer relevant societal questions.
Gentle in its method, the work goes out of its way to emphasize the importance of empirical science.
To begin the construction of a theory to explain how perception can be used as evidence for belief, Kassar covers conceptualism, relationism, relational conceptualism, and relational conceptualism and empirical science.
Part II opens with the advances of empirical science, as cosmically-ordered music gives way to "music as a sounding art" (p.
Perhaps the book's greatest strength and most significant contribution to the controversy is its lucid demonstration of the inability of both empirical science and philosophical naturalism to account for each of these experiences, especially that of existence, a point rather insufficiently attended to in the literature on the topic.
Emerging in 1944, Percy no longer believed the pursuits of education and empirical science held all the answers.

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