Enceladus


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En·cel·a·dus

 (ĕn-sĕl′ə-dəs)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A giant who was defeated in battle and buried under Mount Etna by Athena.
2. A satellite of Saturn.

[Latin, from Greek Enkelados.]

Enceladus

(ɛnˈsɛlədəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a giant who was punished for his rebellion against the gods by a fatal blow from a stone cast by Athena. He was believed to be buried under Mount Etna in Sicily

Enceladus

n
(Celestial Objects) a very bright satellite of Saturn: diameter 505 km; surface made of ice, with water probably underneath; discovered by W. Herschel in 1789
Translations
Encelade
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References in classic literature ?
The hero fell without a groan - he fell while answering Aramis with words of encouragement and hope, for, thanks to the powerful arch of his hands, for an instant he believed that, like Enceladus, he would succeed in shaking off the triple load.
Rather, come and let us all go to help them, or else let loose your weapon, the great and formidable Titan-killer with which you killed Capaneus, that doughty man, and great Enceladus and the wild tribes of Giants; ay, let it loose, for so the most valiant will be slain.
com/cassini-finds-heat-under-south-pole-enceladus-saturns-icy-moon-2507785) potentially life-supporting environment on the gas giant's moons, Enceladus and Titan.
Saturn's icy moon Enceladus has them all, as NASA spacecraft Cassini confirmed in the final years of its mission to that planet.
The icy orb known as Enceladus may boast ideal living conditions for single-celled microorganisms known as archaeans found in some of the most extreme environments on Earth, they reported in the science journal Nature Communications.
Previous research suggested that Enceladus sports an ocean of liquid water -- a key ingredient for life -- beneath its icy surface.
LAHORE -- The conditions required for life to flourish and cutting edge research is being conducted by scientists from various parts of the world to detect microbial life on other planetary bodies such as Saturn's moon, Enceladus and Jupiter's moon, Europa.
Voyager 2 further whetted the appetite for Saturn probes after it sent back images of a bright, smooth surface on the tiny moon of Enceladus in 1981, raising questions about whether it might be volcanic.
Scientists feared a collision with Titan or Enceladus, two of Saturn's moons that in the past 10 years have shown a potential to host simple life.
Cassini's discovery of ocean worlds at Titan and Enceladus changed everything, shaking our views to the core about surprising places to search for potential life beyond Earth," said NASA's Science Mission Directorate associate administrator Thomas Zurbuchen in a briefing.
Another key discovery made by Cassini was a global ocean some six miles deep under the 19-25-mile thick icy surface of another moon, Enceladus.
Enceladus has become a promising lead in the search for places outside Earth that could support life.