encumberment

encumberment

(ɪnˈkʌmbəmənt)
n
the act of being encumbered
References in classic literature ?
The comte, on arriving at the Rue des Lombards, found the shop of the grocer in great confusion; but it was not the encumberment of a lucky sale, or that of an arrival of goods.
He admitted years later that it was an "outrageous encumberment of the telegraphic process," but he believed it was necessary to convey his views accurately.
Physical hazards due to temperature extremes can cause heat illness and loss of productivity (most subsistence agriculture takes place in hot parts of the globe where there is no possibility of air conditioning) or cold injury and loss of productivity as a result of encumberment with many layers of clothing.
It's another encumberment to government entitlement, especially as the weight of aging baby boomers will become a huge strain on the whole system.
The presbytery elects a board of directors that oversees the month-to-month decisions on policy, overall program and budge The presbytery must approve any purchase of land or encumberment (e.
Zizek, however, sees this friction not simply as our lamentable encumberment to a certain geographical place.
Hall believes it "will be necessary for the church of the future to rediscover the `movement' character of the faith and let go of its entrenched forms, boundaries and encumberment of possession.
Forms that require authorization and authentication security to access, as well as full journaling of access and capabilities like digital signature for forms that constitute a legal encumberment.
Uschi would toss off her coat, scarf, shoes and other encumberments, then speed off down the long beach until she was lost from sight.