English Canadian


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English Canadian

n
(Peoples) a Canadian citizen whose first language is English, esp one of English descent
References in periodicals archive ?
As a poet, Klein was part of the Montreal Group, a group of poets who considerably influenced English Canadian literature and who contributed greatly to the renewal of poetry of his era.
The Shortts visited England, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, and the Netherlands, and the diaries and letters describe what they saw and experienced in the context of their perceptions of national identities, illustrating English Canadian experiences in Europe.
Her main research areas are English Canadian fiction and the topic of identity, focusing mainly on ethnic and female novelists before the twentieth century.
BEGINNING IN THE LATE 1960s, English Canadian sociology was strongly shaped by the publication of John Porter's (1965) The Vertical Mosaic, as well as collective scholarly efforts to build a sociology of Canadian society, to train and hire Canadians, and to develop uniquely Canadian "explanatory stances" (Cormier 2004).
Andre speaks fluent French - his dad is a French Canadian and his mam an English Canadian.
Contrasting reactions to multiculturat immigration are hardly the result of English Canadian moral superiority.
For decades French Canadian professional hockey players have faced salary discrimination, allegedly because their language, history, politics, and playing style are different from the more dominant English Canadian players.
THIS IS THE FIRST BOOK ON THE ENGLISH Canadian elegy, and Uppal uses the form's surprising popularity today to consider how and why we mourn.
The English Canadian ended the argument with, 'Why should we learn French?
The Marriage Metaphor in Nineteenth-Century English Canadian Fiction:" Studies in Canadian Literature 13.
While the basic contours of the conscription crisis, for instance, are well known, Rutherdale reveals that on the regional level the debate was far more nuanced than the conventional French versus English Canadian dichotomy suggests.
The idea of Canada as a "British" nation is a theme that has long run through English Canadian historiography, until the "Quiet Revolutions" of the 1960s prompted Canadian historians to begin to emphasize the North American origins of Canadian identity and history.