English Canadian

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Related to English Canadians: French Canadians

English Canadian

n
(Peoples) a Canadian citizen whose first language is English, esp one of English descent
References in periodicals archive ?
This article provides for the first time relevant data that allows a detailed comparison of housing types, values, tenure and occupations of French Canadians, English Canadians and immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, and for the cities of Montreal, Lachine, Outremont, Verdun and Westmount, between 1921 and 1951.
Thus, for English Canadians, who have made a national pastime out of publicly ventilating their sense of cultural uncertainty, the approach of the millennium can't help but conjure up nightmare visions of national oblivion--if we can't figure out what we are by the time the next century hits (which we most likely won't), then we must, as a nation, be doomed.
Would a majority of English Canadians accept such a role for Quebec M.
Canada's pioneer and leader in Internet and Digital Media measurement, recently released April 2000 Web audience ratings for English Canadians at home.
Is this really an identity that English Canadians share and gravitate to in the same ways as earlier generations cultivated understandings of Canada as a northern nation, its hopes and aspirations springing eternal from the deep well of British values and Empire's advances?
English Canadians went into World War Two not only as British subjects but also imagining themselves to be British in that the active ingredient of Canadianness was its Britannic cultural component.
English Canadians see any election in Quebec as a referendum on Canada, not as another provincial election.
Additional papers dealing, among other things, with differences in housing tenure between French and English Canadians -- that most Canadian of topics -- will be published in a second special issue, planned for the spring of 1998.
Shocked that francophone Quebecers still see themselves as a threatened collectivity, English Canadians have resurrected some of the fear of the first period.
As John Richards wrote in Inroads 6, English Canadians have inverted Victorian Puritanism: one is allowed to spill one's sexual secrets but cannot speak openly about political reality.
In the first case, it is newcomers who are represented as "outsiders" to the culture and history of English Canadians, as well as French Canadians and Aboriginal peoples:
But most English Canadians now seemingly care as much about Quebec as most Quebecois care about English Canada: the two solitudes have grown even more indifferent to each other.