West Lothian question

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West Lothian question

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Brit the apparent inconsistency that members of parliament who represent Scottish constituencies are eligible to vote at Westminster on matters that relate only to England, whereas members of parliament from English constituencies are not eligible to vote on Scottish matters
[C20: because the issue was first raised by the Scottish politican Tam Dalyell (born 1932) at the time when he was MP for West Lothian]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Cameron said the move to deal with the issue was likely to form part of the party's manifesto at the next general election and outlined plans to set up an English Grand Committee, which would deal with "English-only legislation".
As you point out, the particular interests of the West Midlands' region are unlikely to be met by an English Grand Committee.
Mr Cameron said the move to set up an English Grand Committee would deal with the so-called "West Lothian Question".
The Tory leader said England-only legislation should be decided by an English grand committee made up of MPs from south of the Border.
An English grand committee in Parliament has no more chance of working than the Tories' other half-baked idea, English votes for English law.
It's the high-handed ways of the Westminster government that is a "threat to the Union", not Malcolm Rifkin's proposal to use an English grand committee for England-only matters.
Under the Tory proposals, a new English Grand Committee - open only to English MPs - would be established to deal with legislation relating solely to England.
Under the plan, a new English Grand Committee - open only to English MPs - would be established to deal with matters, such as schools and hospitals, relating solely to England.
The Conservatives have put forward a comprehensive solution to the West Lothian question in the shape of an English Grand Committee.
Sir Malcolm wants an English grand committee of MPs to vote on Bills that apply only to England.
Under the Conservative proposals an English Grand Committee would be set up to deal with legislation that only affects England.
The suggestion today that the Conservative Party, if it forms the next Government, may establish an English Grand Committee to deal with key policy issues outside of taxation, foreign policy and defence has merit and is worth discussing, but would probably pose as many questions as answers.