puritan

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Pu·ri·tan

 (pyo͝or′ĭ-tn)
n.
1. A member of a group of English Protestants who in the 1500s and 1600s advocated strict religious discipline along with simplification of the ceremonies and creeds of the Church of England.
2. puritan A person who is very strict or austere in religious practice or moral outlook, especially someone who regards pleasure or luxury as sinful.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Puritans or Puritanism.
2. puritan Characteristic of a puritan; puritanical.

[From Late Latin pūritās, purity (on the model of Medieval Latin Kathari, "the Pure Ones," a third-century sect of rigorist heretics), from Latin pūrus, pure; see peuə- in Indo-European roots.]

puritan

(ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
a person who adheres to strict moral or religious principles, esp one opposed to luxury and sensual enjoyment
adj
characteristic of a puritan
[C16: from Late Latin pūritās purity]
ˈpuritanˌism n

Puritan

(in the late 16th and 17th centuries ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
1. (Protestantism) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
2. (Historical Terms) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
adj
3. (Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
4. (Protestantism) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
ˈPuritanˌism n

Pu•ri•tan

(ˈpyʊər ɪ tn)

n.
1. a member of a group of Protestants that arose in the 16th century within the Church of England, demanding the simplification of doctrine and worship and greater strictness in religious discipline.
2. (l.c.) a person who is strict in moral or religious matters.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Puritans.
4. (l.c.) puritanical.
[1540–50; < Late Latin pūrit(ās) purity]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Puritan - a member of a group of English Protestants who in the 16th and 17th centuries thought that the Protestant Reformation under Elizabeth was incomplete and advocated the simplification and regulation of forms of worship
Protestant - an adherent of Protestantism
2.puritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principlespuritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principles; someone opposed to sensual pleasures
abstainer, ascetic - someone who practices self denial as a spiritual discipline
3.puritan - a person excessively concerned about propriety and decorum
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable

puritan

noun
1. moralist, fanatic, zealot, prude, pietist, rigorist He delighted in dealing with subjects that enraged puritans.
adjective
1. strict, austere, puritanical, narrow, severe, intolerant, ascetic, narrow-minded, moralistic, prudish, hidebound, strait-laced Paul has always had a puritan streak.
Quotations
"The Puritan hated bear-baiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators" [Lord Macaulay History of England]

puritan

noun
A person who is too much concerned with being proper, modest, or righteous:
Informal: old maid.
Translations
بيوريتاني: مُتَزَمِّت في أمور الدّينمُتَزَمِّت ، مُتَشَدِّد
-kapuritán
asketpuritaner
puritán
púrítanipúrítani, siîavandur/strangtrúaîur maîur
puritonaspuritoniškas
puritānis
puritán
Püritensofta/bağnaz kimse

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən]
A. ADJpuritano
B. Npuritano/a m/f

Puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (RELIGION)puritain(e) m/f

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (= puritanical person) → puritain(e) m/f

puritan

(Rel: also Puritan)
adjpuritanisch
nPuritaner(in) m(f)

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtn] adj & npuritano/a

puritan

(ˈpjuəritən) noun
1. a person who is strict and disapproves of many kinds of enjoyment.
2. formerly, in England and America, a member of a religious group wanting to make church worship etc simpler and plainer.
ˌpuriˈtanical (-ˈtӕ-) adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
She casts doubt on the conventional wisdom that, by the seventeenth century, English puritans had drawn clear racial lines between Christians and non-Christians, effectively making nonwhites "hereditary heathens" who, because of their race, could not be included in the body of Christ (6).
After establishing this framework, the book's middle section considers "how English puritans categorized physical difference and related those categories to inner characteristics," before turning to a series of "late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century performances that disrupted English puritan notions of faithful bodies" (104).
Unity in Diversity: English Puritans and the Puritan Reformation, 1603-1689
From the mid sixteenth century, English puritans "dreamt of doing away with the bells altogether" as a remnant of popery (151).
BacK in the early 1600s, English Puritans sailed across the Atlantic in the Mayflower to escape persecution in England where King James wanted everyone to worship according to the Anglican Prayer BooK.
The volume is a reworking and updating of her earlier The New Puritans: The Rise of Fundamentalism in the Anglican Church (2007), in which "Sydney Anglicans" are characterized as modern-day equivalents of the English Puritans.
The economic blight led many English Puritans to believe that human history had now entered a final phase, and that great and portentous events connected with the second coming of Christ were underway.
Protagonist Bethia, who grows up amid a small band of pioneering English Puritans, finds allure in Caleb, the young son of a chieftain, and their two very different worlds collide in an absorbing, riveting tale.
Closely associated with this was another idea, taken up by English Puritans, that had its roots deep in Anglo-Saxon history: It saw the 'invisible hand' of Providence also at work in politics to bring about another 'ideal' outcome.
Which pudding was banned by English Puritans because it was deemed to be 'sinfully rich'?
The English Puritans of the early seventeenth century were indoctrinated with the political as well as theological philosophy of Calvinism and did not overlook its democratic teachings, for they were quick to resent any infringement of their rights by their rulers.
1620: A group of English Puritans found Plymouth, the first permanent European settlement in New England.