English language


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
West Germanic, West Germanic language - a branch of the Germanic languages
American English, American language, American - the English language as used in the United States
cockney - the nonstandard dialect of natives of the east end of London
geordie - the nonstandard dialect of natives of Newcastle-upon-Tyne
King's English, Queen's English - English as spoken by educated persons in southern England
Received Pronunciation - the approved pronunciation of British English; originally based on the King's English as spoken at public schools and at Oxford and Cambridge Universities (and widely accepted elsewhere in Britain); until recently it was the pronunciation of English used in British broadcasting
Middle English - English from about 1100 to 1450
Modern English - English since about 1450
Old English, Anglo-Saxon - English prior to about 1100
Oxford English - the dialect of English spoken at Oxford University and regarded by many as affected and pretentious
Scots, Scots English, Scottish - the dialect of English used in Scotland
References in classic literature ?
Whatever his outward demeanour may have been, his poetry gives us no indication of it, being full of delicate mysticism, almost impossible to reproduce in the English language.
It must not be supposed, notwithstanding, that the Normans, however much they despised the English language and literature, made any effort to destroy it.
They had nothing in common but the English language, and tried by its help to express what neither of them understood.
Hayward surrounded his sordid and vulgar little adventures with a glow of poetry, and thought he touched hands with Pericles and Pheidias because to describe the object of his attentions he used the word hetaira instead of one of those, more blunt and apt, provided by the English language.
When the difficulty of learning the English language was subtracted, I found that in the matter of learning trades and in mastering academic studies there was little difference between the coloured and Indian students.
Adolf was one of that numerous band of Swiss and German youths who come to this country prepared to give their services ridiculously cheap in exchange for the opportunity of learning the English language.
The French police offered to send to London one of their best men, well acquainted with the English language, if Lady Lydiard was desirous of employing him.
I take shelter behind the inadequacy of the English language.
Born in poverty at Boston, January 19 1809, dying under painful circumstances at Baltimore, October 7, 1849, his whole literary career of scarcely fifteen years a pitiful struggle for mere subsistence, his memory malignantly misrepresented by his earliest biographer, Griswold, how completely has truth at last routed falsehood and how magnificently has Poe come into his own, For "The Raven," first published in 1845, and, within a few months, read, recited and parodied wherever the English language was spoken, the half-starved poet received $10
Then came Eulalie, the proud beauty, the Juno of the school, whom six long years of drilling in the simple grammar of the English language had compelled, despite the stiff phlegm of her intellect, to acquire a mechanical acquaintance with most of its rules.
Still, however, the necessary intercourse between the lords of the soil, and those oppressed inferior beings by whom that soil was cultivated, occasioned the gradual formation of a dialect, compounded betwixt the French and the Anglo-Saxon, in which they could render themselves mutually intelligible to each other; and from this necessity arose by degrees the structure of our present English language, in which the speech of the victors and the vanquished have been so happily blended together; and which has since been so richly improved by importations from the classical languages, and from those spoken by the southern nations of Europe.
Meriem had progressed rapidly with the intricacies of the English language, for Bwana and My Dear had persistently refused to speak Arabic from the time they had decided that Meriem must learn English, which had been a day or two after her introduction into their home.

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