proverb

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prov·erb

 (prŏv′ûrb′)
n.
1. A short pithy saying in frequent and widespread use that expresses a basic truth or practical precept.
2. Proverbs(used with a sing. verb) See Table at Bible.

[Middle English proverbe, from Old French, from Latin prōverbium : prō-, forth; see pro-1 + verbum, word; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

proverb

(ˈprɒvɜːb)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a short, memorable, and often highly condensed saying embodying, esp with bold imagery, some commonplace fact or experience
2. a person or thing exemplary in respect of a characteristic: Antarctica is a proverb for extreme cold.
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) ecclesiast a wise saying or admonition providing guidance
vb (tr)
4. to utter or describe (something) in the form of a proverb
5. to make (something) a proverb
[C14: via Old French from Latin prōverbium, from verbum word]

pro′-verb`



n.
a word that can substitute for a verb or verb phrase, as do in They never attend meetings, but I do.
[1905–10]

prov•erb

(ˈprɒv ərb)

n.
1. a short popular saying, usu. of unknown and ancient origin, that expresses effectively some commonplace truth or useful thought; adage; saw.
2. a person or thing commonly regarded as an embodiment or representation of some quality; byword.
3. a profound Biblical saying, maxim, or oracular utterance requiring interpretation.
[1275–1325; Middle English proverbe < Middle French < Latin prōverbium=prō- pro-1 + verb(um) word + -ium -ium1]

proverb


Past participle: proverbed
Gerund: proverbing

Imperative
proverb
proverb
Present
I proverb
you proverb
he/she/it proverbs
we proverb
you proverb
they proverb
Preterite
I proverbed
you proverbed
he/she/it proverbed
we proverbed
you proverbed
they proverbed
Present Continuous
I am proverbing
you are proverbing
he/she/it is proverbing
we are proverbing
you are proverbing
they are proverbing
Present Perfect
I have proverbed
you have proverbed
he/she/it has proverbed
we have proverbed
you have proverbed
they have proverbed
Past Continuous
I was proverbing
you were proverbing
he/she/it was proverbing
we were proverbing
you were proverbing
they were proverbing
Past Perfect
I had proverbed
you had proverbed
he/she/it had proverbed
we had proverbed
you had proverbed
they had proverbed
Future
I will proverb
you will proverb
he/she/it will proverb
we will proverb
you will proverb
they will proverb
Future Perfect
I will have proverbed
you will have proverbed
he/she/it will have proverbed
we will have proverbed
you will have proverbed
they will have proverbed
Future Continuous
I will be proverbing
you will be proverbing
he/she/it will be proverbing
we will be proverbing
you will be proverbing
they will be proverbing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been proverbing
you have been proverbing
he/she/it has been proverbing
we have been proverbing
you have been proverbing
they have been proverbing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been proverbing
you will have been proverbing
he/she/it will have been proverbing
we will have been proverbing
you will have been proverbing
they will have been proverbing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been proverbing
you had been proverbing
he/she/it had been proverbing
we had been proverbing
you had been proverbing
they had been proverbing
Conditional
I would proverb
you would proverb
he/she/it would proverb
we would proverb
you would proverb
they would proverb
Past Conditional
I would have proverbed
you would have proverbed
he/she/it would have proverbed
we would have proverbed
you would have proverbed
they would have proverbed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proverb - a condensed but memorable saying embodying some important fact of experience that is taken as true by many people
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"

proverb

noun saying, saw, maxim, gnome, adage, dictum, aphorism, byword, apophthegm the old proverb `where there's a will, there's a way`

proverb

noun
A usually pithy and familiar statement expressing an observation or principle generally accepted as wise or true:
Translations
مَثَلمَثَل، قَوْل مأثور
přísloví
ordsprogtalemåde
vanasõna
sananlaskusanonta
poslovica
közmondás
málsháttur
ことわざ
격언
kaip sakomapatarlėtapęs priežodžiu
parunasakāmvārds
príslovie
pregovor
poslovica
ordspråk
สุภาษิต
tục ngữ

proverb

[ˈprɒvɜːb] Nrefrán m, proverbio m

proverb

[ˈprɒvɜːrb] nproverbe m

proverb

nSprichwort nt; (the Book of) Proverbsdie Sprüche pl

proverb

[ˈprɒvɜːb] nproverbio

proverb

(ˈprovəːb) noun
a well-known saying that gives good advice or expresses a supposed truth. Two common proverbs are `Many hands make light work' and `Don't count your chickens before they're hatched!'
proˈverbial adjective
proˈverbially adverb

proverb

مَثَل přísloví talemåde Sprichwort παροιμία refrán sananlasku proverbe poslovica proverbio ことわざ 격언 gezegde ordspråk przysłowie provérbio пословица ordspråk สุภาษิต atasözü tục ngữ 谚语
References in classic literature ?
One of them, a grave and sensible man, told me he was convinced they were in the wrong; that it was not the part of wise men to give themselves up to their misery, but always to take hold of the helps which reason offered, as well for present support as for future deliverance: he told me that grief was the most senseless, insignificant passion in the world, for that it regarded only things past, which were generally impossible to be recalled or to be remedied, but had no views of things to come, and had no share in anything that looked like deliverance, but rather added to the affliction than proposed a remedy; and upon this he repeated a Spanish proverb, which, though I cannot repeat in the same words that he spoke it in, yet I remember I made it into an English proverb of my own, thus:-
The captain understood my raillery very well, and merrily replied with the old English proverb, "that he doubted mine eyes were bigger than my belly, for he did not observe my stomach so good, although I had fasted all day;" and, continuing in his mirth, protested "he would have gladly given a hundred pounds, to have seen my closet in the eagle's bill, and afterwards in its fall from so great a height into the sea; which would certainly have been a most astonishing object, worthy to have the description of it transmitted to future ages:" and the comparison of Phaeton was so obvious, that he could not forbear applying it, although I did not much admire the conceit.
From a hundred rabbits you can't make a horse, a hundred suspicions don't make a proof, as the English proverb says, but that's only from the rational point of view--you can't help being partial, for after all a lawyer is only human.
Yoruba and English proverbs compare women to animals, food, plants, property, and trouble Kehinde (2005).
My e-book on English proverbs can be downloaded from: http://quickbooks.
Through surveying a diachronic sample of scholarly discussion and translation of this proverb, this paper also illustrates how subtle syntactic change can compound the challenges of interpreting Old English proverbs since the reader has neither full knowledge of the cultural context nor native speaker intuitions regarding the grammar of the language.
The computer-based tests consisted of five multiple-choice questions for which the learners had to read the proverbs in Chinese and choose the matching English proverbs.
Then each group acted out the Swahili proverb in an effort to get the other students to guess what the proverb's meaning equates to with English proverbs.
Rozumko also comments on the possible reasons as to why so many English proverbs have been borrowed into Polish, tentatively concluding that they are a result of the influence of the popular and philosophical Anglo-American culture.
The first part was about understanding meanings of words used in English proverbs and idioms.
It has been suggested it comes from the game of skittles or ninepins, but The Phrase Finder has found the first reference in a book of English proverbs from 1659: "as fine as fippence, as neat as nine pence.