hepatotoxicity

(redirected from Enlarged liver)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to Enlarged liver: hepatomegaly, fatty liver

hep·a·to·tox·ic·i·ty

 (hĕp′ə-tō-tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē, hĭ-păt′ō-)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being toxic or destructive to the liver.
2. The capacity of a substance to have damaging effects on the liver.

hep′a·to·tox′ic (-tŏk′sĭk) adj.

hepatotoxicity

(ˌhɛpətəʊtɒkˈsɪsɪtɪ)
n
(Medicine) the state or quality of being hepatoxic
Translations

hep·a·to·tox·ic·i·ty

n. hepatotoxicidad, la tendencia de un fármaco o producto tóxico a dañar el hígado.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abdominal examination revealed a markedly distended abdomen with prominent dilated veins, a positive fluid thrill and enlarged liver was palpable approximately 10 cm the right sub costal margin.
But initial forensic examination showed she had an enlarged liver, which weighed more than a kilo-not normal for a 10-year-old, Erfe said.
Enlarged Liver with Multiple Cysts within the Liver
Taking more than the recommended amount of iron over time can cause brown skin discoloration, an enlarged liver or spleen, abdominal pain, congestive heart failure, an irregular heart rhythm, and insulin dependent diabetes, just to name a few.
In cases caused by hepatitis B, there can also be an enlarged liver.
Most patients have various skeletal abnormalities, heart valve abnormalities, enlarged liver and splee and narrowed airways.
It turned out that the young girl had an enlarged liver, and elevated liver enzymes, leukocytes, hemoglobin and an unstable temperature.
Finally, the more unusual symptoms that are especially helpful signposts are pain in the center or right upper part of the abdomen, dark urine, bruising easily, excessive sweat, dry and dark patches on the neck and under arms, and, of course, an enlarged liver.
The gross lesions revealed the enlarged liver and diffused nodular tumor lesions (0.
Ultrasound abdomen and pelvis showed massively enlarged liver, measuring 23.
Babies born with HLH usually develop symptoms within the first months, which may include fever, enlarged liver or spleen, a low number of blood cells and neurological abnormalities.
The team also diagnosed a slew of health conditions: a common chest wall deformity called pectus excavatum, or sunken chest (B); bone density marks called Harris lines in his leg bones that indicate physiological stress (C) and an enlarged liver (D).