ensoul

(redirected from Ensoulment)
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en·soul

 (ĕn-sōl′)
tr.v. en·souled, en·soul·ing, en·souls
1. To endow with a soul.
2. To place, receive, or cherish in the soul.

en·soul′ment n.

ensoul

(ɪnˈsəʊl) or

insoul

vb (tr)
1. (Theology) to endow with a soul
2. (Theology) to cherish within the soul
enˈsoulment, inˈsoulment n

en•soul

(ɛnˈsoʊl)

v.t.
to endow with a soul.

ensoul


Past participle: ensouled
Gerund: ensouling

Imperative
ensoul
ensoul
Present
I ensoul
you ensoul
he/she/it ensouls
we ensoul
you ensoul
they ensoul
Preterite
I ensouled
you ensouled
he/she/it ensouled
we ensouled
you ensouled
they ensouled
Present Continuous
I am ensouling
you are ensouling
he/she/it is ensouling
we are ensouling
you are ensouling
they are ensouling
Present Perfect
I have ensouled
you have ensouled
he/she/it has ensouled
we have ensouled
you have ensouled
they have ensouled
Past Continuous
I was ensouling
you were ensouling
he/she/it was ensouling
we were ensouling
you were ensouling
they were ensouling
Past Perfect
I had ensouled
you had ensouled
he/she/it had ensouled
we had ensouled
you had ensouled
they had ensouled
Future
I will ensoul
you will ensoul
he/she/it will ensoul
we will ensoul
you will ensoul
they will ensoul
Future Perfect
I will have ensouled
you will have ensouled
he/she/it will have ensouled
we will have ensouled
you will have ensouled
they will have ensouled
Future Continuous
I will be ensouling
you will be ensouling
he/she/it will be ensouling
we will be ensouling
you will be ensouling
they will be ensouling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ensouling
you have been ensouling
he/she/it has been ensouling
we have been ensouling
you have been ensouling
they have been ensouling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ensouling
you will have been ensouling
he/she/it will have been ensouling
we will have been ensouling
you will have been ensouling
they will have been ensouling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ensouling
you had been ensouling
he/she/it had been ensouling
we had been ensouling
you had been ensouling
they had been ensouling
Conditional
I would ensoul
you would ensoul
he/she/it would ensoul
we would ensoul
you would ensoul
they would ensoul
Past Conditional
I would have ensouled
you would have ensouled
he/she/it would have ensouled
we would have ensouled
you would have ensouled
they would have ensouled
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
It is true, as she says, when life begins (meaning ensoulment and not biological life) is not a scientific question.
He made a distinction between embryo inanimatus (not yet endowed with a soul) and embryo animatus (having a soul), using the ensoulment distinction that was often employed to define personhood.
Perhaps they considered their discoveries about embryology in light of Christian teachings on the soul, concluding that ensoulment happened at a point in pregnancy earlier than quickening?
In the same way that poetry allows readers to empathetically access the pain of others, so too does ensoulment.
Ancient philosophers link the body and the soul, yet many, including Platonist and Neo-Platonist thinkers, reject the ensoulment of a fetus (Carrick, 1985).
For them, this position depends on genomic novelty, constituting as it does the bulwark for indicating the presence of a unique individual, ensoulment, and with it a moral claim based in the will of God.
Others believe the ensoulment occurs at birth, and still others upon baptism.
In treating Aquinas's account of when human life ends, Amerini notes that, for Aquinas, "with the loss of rational ensoulment, the body ceases immediately to be human and ensouled," and that "the property of 'being a human being' does not depend on the use, but on the possession of a capacity [for reason] that can be realized in more or less perfect form, or even never realized.
The old sexist arguments have become much less socially acceptable, but theories about ensoulment or personhood beginning at conception have been around since at least the days of Hippocrates, when they seesawed back and forth in popularity with rival views like Aristotle's that alleged the soul formed more gradually as the fetus developed.
Such an objector will likely maintain that the continuum argument is a rationalization that would not carry reflective conviction apart from acceptance of the ensoulment view or some other religious doctrine.
From other sacred sources, it is understood that ensoulment only happens after 120 days, and abortion is allowed before this period.
There remains profound disagreement as to whether at this early stage the fetus has acquired personhood or, to put it more theologically, ensoulment.