epagoge


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epagoge

(ˌɛpəˈɡəʊɡiː; ˌɛpəˈɡəʊdʒiː)
n
(Logic) inductive reasoning
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Mark McPherran, interpretations of particular elenchoi often run aground owing to the failure to appreciate the role epagoge (very roughly, inductive argument) plays in getting an interlocutor to assent to a crucial premise.
Interpretations of Aristotelian epagoge (induction) have swung widely, and the largest factor in the variation has been the role played by Prior Analytics II 23.
Uses of the term epagoge in the rest of the corpus are more cursory and individually of less substance.
The best place to begin a study of Aristotelian epagoge is not the Analytics, but the Topics and the Rhetoric.
Aristotle holds that it was Socrates who first made frequent, systematic use of epagoge in his elenctic investigations of various definitions of the virtues (Meta.
1) The translation of sullogismos as "deduction," instead of "syllogism," is a matter for discussion, but the term "deduction" here exclusively pertains to Aristotle's conception of deduction in the same way as epagoge, translated as "induction," is confined to his view on induction.