epicondyle

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ep·i·con·dyle

 (ĕp′ĭ-kŏn′dĭl, -dl)
n.
A rounded projection at the end of a bone, located on or above a condyle and usually serving as a place of attachment for ligaments and tendons.

epicondyle

(ˌɛpɪˈkɒndɪl)
n
(Anatomy) a bone projection above a condyle
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicondyle - a projection on a bone above a condyle serving for the attachment of muscles and ligaments
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
lateral epicondyle - epicondyle near the lateral condyle of the femur
Translations

ep·i·con·dyle

n. epicóndilo, eminencia sobre el cóndilo de un hueso.

epicondyle

n (of elbow) (lateral) epicóndilo (lateral); (medial) epitróclea, epi-cóndilo medial (esp. Amer)
References in periodicals archive ?
In another study, the medial and lateral epicondyles of the femur were used as bony landmarks and the distance to the motor branch of the gastrocnemius muscle was measured in order to determine the motor branch NEP (Yoo et al.
The maximum distance between the two epicondyles was measured as the condylar width (Figure 1).
Digital percussion of the epicondyles produced pain on the lateral epicondyle.
These markers were attached to the xiphoid process, sternal notch, spinous process of the seventh cervical and eighth thoracic vertebrae, left and right acromioclavicular joints, medial and lateral epicondyles of the elbow, radial and ulnar styloid processes, knuckles II and V, anterior superior iliac spine, posterior superior iliac spine, and a triad of markers on the upper arm.
She had negative Tinel's sign and Phalen's test and no tenderness at the epicondyles.
The branches were measured in reference to the elbow articular line, (determined by the medial and lateral epicondyles of humerus) by a divider and a ruler.
Static trials used to calculate joint centers included additional markers on the medial femoral epicondyles and medial malleoli.
Humerus breadth (biepicondylar) was measured the distance between medial and lateral epicondyles of the humerus when the arm is raised forward to the horizontal and the forearm is flexed to a right angle at the elbow.
However, remember that the muscles of the forearm that attach to the epicondyles exert their action at the wrist.
Lateral and medial epicondyles are distally blunt and subequal in distal extension, showing gently convex external margins.
If skeletal traction was applied through femoral epicondyles for 4-6 weeks after osteosynthesis operation to patients with acetabular injuries, then we activated patients by using our dynamic unloading device on the second day after surgery, which allowed them to load injured extremity and make functional movements of the joint.