epidemiology

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ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

 (ĕp′ĭ-dē′mē-ŏl′ə-jē, -dĕm′ē-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the study of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations.

[Medieval Latin epidēmia, an epidemic; see epidemic + -logy.]

ep′i·de′mi·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ep′i·de′mi·ol′o·gist n.

epidemiology

(ˌɛpɪˌdiːmɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Medicine) the branch of medical science concerned with the occurrence, transmission, and control of epidemic diseases
epidemiological, ˌepiˌdemioˈlogic adj
ˌepiˌdemioˈlogically adv
ˌepiˌdemiˈologist n

ep•i•de•mi•ol•o•gy

(ˌɛp ɪˌdi miˈɒl ə dʒi, -ˌdɛm i-)

n.
1. the branch of medicine dealing with the incidence and prevalence of disease in large populations and with detection of the source and cause of epidemics.
2. the factors contributing to the presence or absence of a disease.
[1870–75]
ep`i•de`mi•o•log′i•cal (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
ep`i•de`mi•o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
ep`i•de`mi•ol′o•gist, n.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ĕp′ĭ-dē′mē-ŏl′ə-jē)
The branch of medicine that deals with the study of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations.

epidemiology

1. the study of the relationships of the various factors determining the frequency and distribution of diseases in a human community.
2. the field of medicine that attempts to determine the exact causes of localized outbreaks of disease. — epidemiologist, n. — epidemiologie, epidemiological, adj.
See also: Medical Specialties

epidemiology

The branch of medicine that deals with epidemics, including their transmission and control.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epidemiology - the branch of medical science dealing with the transmission and control of disease
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
index case - the earliest documented case of a disease that is included in an epidemiological study
prevalence - (epidemiology) the ratio (for a given time period) of the number of occurrences of a disease or event to the number of units at risk in the population
Translations
epidemiologie
epidemiologia
faraldsfræði

epidemiology

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

n. epidemiología, estudio de las causas de las enfermedades epidémicas y la distribución en poblaciones.

epidemiology

n epidemiología, estudio de la propagación de enfermedades en poblaciones
References in periodicals archive ?
Epidemiologists and related professionals explore the role epidemiologists can play in agenda setting, program development, implementation and evaluation of interventions in public health practice.
While many epidemiologists at state health agencies feel adequately prepared to do their jobs, there are opportunities to improve their training, a new study finds.
In the 7MM, GlobalData epidemiologists forecast that the diagnosed incident cases of IPF will increase from 53,139 cases in 2015 to 62,258 cases in 2025, at an Annual Growth Rate (AGR) of 1.
Megan Davies took office in June as the president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE).
GlobalData epidemiologists forecast that there will be approximately 14,703,622 12-month and 24,616,577 lifetime total prevalent cases of bipolar disorder in 2024.
The goal of this training is to harmonize the understanding of International Health Regulations (IHR) and practices of current and future epidemiologists in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR).
Since 2001, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) periodically has conducted a standardized national assessment of state health departments' core epidemiology capacity (1-4).
A four-person team of epidemiologists and risk assessors has taken a somewhat unusual step for their fields: working closely together.
They also provide background to help other legal and law enforcement professionals interact with epidemiologists.
Epidemiologists analyze health problems like infectious diseases, heart disease, and drug use.
If Waldo were someone with MS, epidemiologists would want to know how many Waldos there are in a group.
The two epidemiologists had met just once, and Stevens wasn't confident that his 209-word note, or the suggestion that it contained about a possible contributor to breast cancer, would inspire any action.

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