epithet

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ep·i·thet

 (ĕp′ə-thĕt′)
n.
1.
a. A term used to characterize a person or thing, such as rosy-fingered in rosy-fingered dawn or the Great in Catherine the Great.
b. A term used as a descriptive substitute for the name or title of a person, such as The Great Emancipator for Abraham Lincoln.
2. A disparaging or abusive word or phrase.
3. Biology A word in the scientific name of an organism following the name of the genus and denoting a species, subspecies, variety, or cultivar, as sativa in Lactuca sativa.

[Latin epitheton, from Greek, neuter of epithetos, added, attributed, from epitithenai, epithe-, to add to : epi-, epi- + tithenai, to place; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·thet′ic, ep′i·thet′i·cal adj.

epithet

(ˈɛpɪˌθɛt)
n
a descriptive word or phrase added to or substituted for a person's name: "Lackland" is an epithet for King John.
[C16: from Latin epitheton, from Greek, from epitithenai to add, from tithenai to put]
ˌepiˈthetic, ˌepiˈthetical adj

ep•i•thet

(ˈɛp əˌθɛt)

n.
1. a characterizing word or phrase added to or used in place of the name of a person or thing.
2. a word, phrase, or expression used invectively as a term of abuse or contempt.
[1570–80; < Latin epitheton epithet, adjective < Greek epítheton epithet, something added]
ep`i•thet′ic, ep`i•thet′i•cal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epithet - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
calumniation, calumny, defamation, hatchet job, traducement, obloquy - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
smear word - an epithet that can be used to smear someone's reputation; "he used the smear word `communist' for everyone who disagreed with him"
2.epithet - descriptive word or phrase
characterisation, characterization, delineation, depiction, word picture, word-painting, picture - a graphic or vivid verbal description; "too often the narrative was interrupted by long word pictures"; "the author gives a depressing picture of life in Poland"; "the pamphlet contained brief characterizations of famous Vermonters"

epithet

noun
1. name, title, description, tag, nickname, designation, appellation, sobriquet, moniker or monicker (slang) players who fitted their manager's epithet of `headless chickens'
2. curse, obscenity, blasphemy, swear word, imprecation a stream of obscene epithets

epithet

noun
1. The word or words by which one is called and identified:
Slang: handle, moniker.
2. A profane or obscene term:
Informal: cuss.
Translations
epithetonscheldnaamschimpnaamtoenaam
epitet

epithet

[ˈepɪθet] Nepíteto m

epithet

[ˈɛpɪθɛt] népithète f

epithet

nBeiname m, → Epitheton nt (geh); (= insulting name)Schimpfname m

epithet

[ˈɛpɪθɛt] nepiteto
References in classic literature ?
Colonel Delafield, or General--no, Field Marshal Delafield, is an officer that might teach"--as Miss Osgood spoke with short interruptions between her epithets, as if in search of proper terms, she dwelt a moment on the last word in such a manner as to give it a particular emphasis--Charlotte started, more perhaps from the manner than the expression, and turning her glowing face towards her friend, she cried involuntarily--
Yes, novels; for I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolitic custom so common with novel-writers, of degrading by their contemptuous censure the very performances, to the number of which they are themselves adding -- joining with their greatest enemies in bestowing the harshest epithets on such works, and scarcely ever permitting them to be read by their own heroine, who, if she accidentally take up a novel, is sure to turn over its insipid pages with disgust.
I hesitate not to submit it to the decision of any candid and honest adversary of the proposed government, whether language can furnish epithets of too much asperity, for so shameless and so prostitute an attempt to impose on the citizens of America.
This cold officer upon a monument, who dropped epithets unconcernedly down, would be finer as a dead man, he thought.
And as I departed, he went on cursing and abusing my faithful friend and servant with epithets I will not defile this paper with repeating.
I don't know; but if they do, I believe he merits the epithet.
He invariably met her criticisms with a good-natured grin and a flippant remark with some tender epithet tagged on to it.
Beautiful is an epithet often used in Scripture, and always mentioned with honour.
Thus they denote the folly of a servant, an omission of a child, a stone that cuts their feet, a continuance of foul or unseasonable weather, and the like, by adding to each the epithet of YAHOO.
We speak of what is white as large, because the surface over which the white extends is large; we speak of an action or a process as lengthy, because the time covered is long; these things cannot in their own right claim the quantitative epithet.
He was accustomed to say that Papists required an epithet, they were Roman Catholic; but the Church of England was Catholic in the best, the fullest, and the noblest sense of the term.
Napoleon apparently remembered seeing him on the battlefield and, addressing him, again used the epithet "young man" that was connected in his memory with Prince Andrew.