epithet

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ep·i·thet

 (ĕp′ə-thĕt′)
n.
1.
a. A term used to characterize a person or thing, such as rosy-fingered in rosy-fingered dawn or the Great in Catherine the Great.
b. A term used as a descriptive substitute for the name or title of a person, such as The Great Emancipator for Abraham Lincoln.
2. A disparaging or abusive word or phrase.
3. Biology A word in the scientific name of an organism following the name of the genus and denoting a species, subspecies, variety, or cultivar, as sativa in Lactuca sativa.

[Latin epitheton, from Greek, neuter of epithetos, added, attributed, from epitithenai, epithe-, to add to : epi-, epi- + tithenai, to place; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·thet′ic, ep′i·thet′i·cal adj.

epithet

(ˈɛpɪˌθɛt)
n
a descriptive word or phrase added to or substituted for a person's name: "Lackland" is an epithet for King John.
[C16: from Latin epitheton, from Greek, from epitithenai to add, from tithenai to put]
ˌepiˈthetic, ˌepiˈthetical adj

ep•i•thet

(ˈɛp əˌθɛt)

n.
1. a characterizing word or phrase added to or used in place of the name of a person or thing.
2. a word, phrase, or expression used invectively as a term of abuse or contempt.
[1570–80; < Latin epitheton epithet, adjective < Greek epítheton epithet, something added]
ep`i•thet′ic, ep`i•thet′i•cal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epithet - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
calumniation, calumny, defamation, hatchet job, traducement, obloquy - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
smear word - an epithet that can be used to smear someone's reputation; "he used the smear word `communist' for everyone who disagreed with him"
2.epithet - descriptive word or phrase
characterisation, characterization, delineation, depiction, word picture, word-painting, picture - a graphic or vivid verbal description; "too often the narrative was interrupted by long word pictures"; "the author gives a depressing picture of life in Poland"; "the pamphlet contained brief characterizations of famous Vermonters"

epithet

noun
1. name, title, description, tag, nickname, designation, appellation, sobriquet, moniker or monicker (slang) players who fitted their manager's epithet of `headless chickens'
2. curse, obscenity, blasphemy, swear word, imprecation a stream of obscene epithets

epithet

noun
1. The word or words by which one is called and identified:
Slang: handle, moniker.
2. A profane or obscene term:
Informal: cuss.
Translations
epithetonscheldnaamschimpnaamtoenaam
epitet

epithet

[ˈepɪθet] Nepíteto m

epithet

[ˈɛpɪθɛt] népithète f

epithet

nBeiname m, → Epitheton nt (geh); (= insulting name)Schimpfname m

epithet

[ˈɛpɪθɛt] nepiteto
References in classic literature ?
That were impossible," returned the young man; "he called you by a thousand endearing epithets, that I may not presume to use, but to the justice of which, I can warmly testify.
Lying thus, wide awake, she fell into a dreamy reminiscence of the past, hearing snatches of old melody in the moving pines, fragments of sentences, old words, and familiar epithets in the murmuring wind at her ear, and even the faint breath of long-forgotten kisses on her cheek.
The king was in a flaming fury, and launched out his challenge and epithets with a most royal vigor.
Soft is the very word for her eyeof all epithets, the justest that could be given.
I hesitate not to submit it to the decision of any candid and honest adversary of the proposed government, whether language can furnish epithets of too much asperity, for so shameless and so prostitute an attempt to impose on the citizens of America.
They had a rapid altercation, in which they fastened upon each other various strange epithets.
On such an evening Antonio could do nothing but converse of my absent friend; he dwelt on the indescribable grace of your person, the lustre of your eye, and the vermilion of your lips, until exhausted language could furnish no more epithets of rapture: then the transition to your mind was natural and easy; and it was while listening to his honied accents that I thought my Julia herself was talking.
We use round, general, gentlemanly epithets about a young man of birth and fortune; and ladies, with that fine intuition which is the distinguishing attribute of their sex, see at once that he is "nice.
I like unexaggerated intercourse; it is not my way to overpower with amorous epithets, any more than to worry with selfishly importunate caresses.
Be fore, however, he was quite locked—to use the language that would suit the Della-cruscan humor of certain refined minds of the present day—” in the arms of Morpheus,” he spoke aloud, observing due pauses between his epithets, the impressive terms of “monkey,” “parrot,” “picnic,” “tar pot,” and
It was by no means lovely, but as the man gathered up his reins he called it a Moon of Paradise, a Disturber of Integrity, and a few other fantastic epithets which doubled her up with mirth.
When I meet a dog of my acquaintance I slap his head, call him opprobrious epithets, and roll him over on his back; and there he lies, gaping at me, and doesn't mind it a bit.