suffrage

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suf·frage

 (sŭf′rĭj)
n.
1.
a. The right or privilege of voting; franchise.
b. The exercise of such a right.
2. A vote cast in deciding a disputed question or in electing a person to office.
3. A short intercessory prayer.

[Middle English, intercessory prayer, from Old French, from Medieval Latin suffrāgium, from Latin, the right to vote, from suffrāgārī, to express support; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

suffrage

(ˈsʌfrɪdʒ)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the right to vote, esp in public elections; franchise
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the exercise of such a right; casting a vote
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a supporting vote
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a prayer, esp a short intercessory prayer
[C14: from Latin suffrāgium]

suf•frage

(ˈsʌf rɪdʒ)

n.
1. the right to vote, esp. in a political election.
2. a vote given in favor of a proposed measure, candidate, or the like.
3. a prayer, esp. a short intercessory prayer or petition.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin suffrāgium voting tablet, vote = Latin suffrāg(ārī) to vote for, support + -ium -ium1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suffrage - a legal right guaranteed by the 15th amendment to the US Constitutionsuffrage - a legal right guaranteed by the 15th amendment to the US Constitution; guaranteed to women by the 19th amendment; "American women got the vote in 1920"
universal suffrage - suffrage for all adults who are not disqualified by the laws of the country
enfranchisement, franchise - a statutory right or privilege granted to a person or group by a government (especially the rights of citizenship and the right to vote)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

suffrage

noun right to vote, vote, franchise, voice, ballot, consent, enfranchisement the women's suffrage movement

suffrage

noun
The right or chance to express an opinion or participate in a decision:
Informal: say-so.
Translations
إقْتِراع، تَصْويتحَق الإقْتِراع
hlasovánívolební právo
afstemningstemmeretvalg
atkvæîagreiîslakosningaréttur
rinkimų teisėsufražistė
balsošanabalsstiesībasvēlēšanu tiesības
hlasovacie právo
oy vermeoy verme hakkı

suffrage

[ˈsʌfrɪdʒ] N
1. (= franchise) → sufragio m
universal suffragesufragio m universal
2. (frm) (= vote) → sufragio m, voto m

suffrage

[ˈsʌfrɪdʒ] nsuffrage m

suffrage

nWahl- or Stimmrecht nt; (form: = vote) → Stimme f; universal suffragedas allgemeine Wahlrecht; female suffragedas Frauenstimmrecht

suffrage

[ˈsʌfrɪdʒ] nsuffragio

suffrage

(ˈsafridʒ) noun
1. the right to vote.
2. voting.
ˌsuffraˈgette (-ˈdʒet) noun
one of the women who worked and fought for women's right to vote.
References in periodicals archive ?
We note that the voting card prepared by the Former Directors did not provide fair and equal voting options and would have deprived Sinovac shareholders of their fundamental right to elect the Company's Board of Directors.
The celebrations of International Womens Day this year are, therefore, particularly poignant as we reflect upon the struggles that women endured in order to secure equal voting rights and all the progress made since.
The banner was used by the newly formed Cardiff and District Women's Suffrage Society at a mass demonstration in London to demand equal voting rights.
The banner was used by the Cardiff and District Women's Suffrage Society who were returning from a mass demonstration in London to demand equal voting rights.
B) announced on Wednesday that its capital consists of 4,597,136,050 A shares and 3,745,486,731 B shares, each with equal voting rights.
In 1918, women aged over 30 were given the right to vote - an important step on the path to full and equal voting rights for all women.
Changes in attitudes to voting started before 1918 through the Suffragettes movement, which included demonstrations for equal voting rights.
After two centuries of struggle for equal voting rights, the Representation of the People Act (1918) was given royal assent on February 6.
In a debate at Holyrood to mark the centenary, Sturgeon said: "Women have had equal voting rights to men for 90 years but the uncomfortable truth is that gender equality is still an unwon cause that is the duty of our generation to win.
The time has now come for the UK Government to extend the franchise to all 16- and 17-year-olds, and ensure equal voting rights across the United Kingdom.
And Shadow Youth minister Cat Smith said: "The time has come for the UK Government to extend equal voting rights.
who successfully fought for equal voting rights for all Americans, equal public accommodations and equal access to housing and equality in employment, regardless of the color of their skin.