Erastianism


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Erastianism

(ɪˈræstɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the theory that the state should have authority over the church in ecclesiastical matters
[C17: named after Thomas Erastus (1524–83), Swiss theologian to whom such views were attributed]
Eˈrastian n, adj

Erastianism

the doctrine stating that in ecclesiastical affairs the state rules over the church. — Erastian, n., adj.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Erastianism - the doctrine that the state is supreme over the church in ecclesiastical matters
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
References in periodicals archive ?
His attitude is optimistic and his hope is for continuing reform which would eliminate the Erastianism in the Elizabethan Settlement.
The revolutionary trauma of Charles I's execution and the church's exile had shaken the bishops' support of the long-dominant Erastianism in English ecclesiastical affairs.
Jenkins demonstrates that Jewel's religious convictions were firmly Reformed, albeit more beholden to Zurich than Geneva, but that Jewel's equally firm Erastianism forced him to embrace a doctrinal minimalism.
Gallicanism, Erastianism, and related Conciliarist movements are also representative of this trend.
Protestants early on lost confidence in the unifying force of Biblical religion, and settled for Erastianism, state-controlled churches.
Erastianism is a historical term often used imprecisely as a virtual synonym with Max Weber's caesaropapism, that is, a more or less absolute dominance of the civil authority exercised over spiritual matters and ministry.
The Last Days of Erastianism Forms in the American Church-State Nexus, 62 HARV.
According to Jenkins, this Erastianism explains Jewel's lackadaisical theology: "When using Erastianism as a prism, Jewel's lack of theologically precise doctrinal formulations becomes not some complex via media between Rome and Geneva, but a means whereby a political necessity was wedded to an ecclesiastical virtue" (245).
Because the Jerusalem Bishopric controversy exposed the Erastianism of the Anglican Church (and therefore, with horrible irony, imputed the true essence of "Popery" to the Anglican Church), it became the issue that, according to Newman, "finally shattered [his] faith ha the Anglican Church," serving as "the ultimate condemnation of the old theory of the Via Media" (117, 122).