Erastianism


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Erastianism

(ɪˈræstɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the theory that the state should have authority over the church in ecclesiastical matters
[C17: named after Thomas Erastus (1524–83), Swiss theologian to whom such views were attributed]
Eˈrastian n, adj

Erastianism

the doctrine stating that in ecclesiastical affairs the state rules over the church. — Erastian, n., adj.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Erastianism - the doctrine that the state is supreme over the church in ecclesiastical matters
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
References in periodicals archive ?
The second error was Erastianism, a settlement that emerged out of the Protestant Reformation, whereby the Church is suffered to exist, and may even be accorded certain favors from the state, but owes its continued existence to grants of privilege by the government rather than being seen as having independent and God-given authority for its mission.
Protestants early on lost confidence in the unifying force of Biblical religion, and settled for Erastianism, state-controlled churches.
Erastianism is a historical term often used imprecisely as a virtual synonym with Max Weber's caesaropapism, that is, a more or less absolute dominance of the civil authority exercised over spiritual matters and ministry.
The 1753 Marriage Act crystallized the weak Erastianism of the Court Whig regime by annexing marriage and married relations to the business of an administered state.
116) English politicians were more comfortable with Erastianism, as bishops had long been appointed by the crown and sat in the House of Lords.
lt;<This bull was a new Unigenitus, condemning conciliarism, Erastianism (in the form of the Gallican articles of 1682), iconoclasm, vernacular worship, and all the writings commended by Ricci, including, of course, Quesnel's Moral Reflexions.
His early forays into the standing army and occasional conformity controversies are informed by Defoe's Erastianism and adherence to 'Old' dissent, championing statist intervention and advocating eventual comprehension for nonconformists within the national Church (p.
The Last Days of Erastianism Forms in the American Church-State Nexus, 62 HARV.
According to Jenkins, this Erastianism explains Jewel's lackadaisical theology: "When using Erastianism as a prism, Jewel's lack of theologically precise doctrinal formulations becomes not some complex via media between Rome and Geneva, but a means whereby a political necessity was wedded to an ecclesiastical virtue" (245).
1998) (defining Erastianism as a "sixteenth-century heresy which held the state to be the lawful superior of the Church, even in ecclesiastical affairs").
21) While the phrase "Poetical Church and State" satirically awards supremacy to poetry, its thematic union of poetry, religion, and government is actually an inversion of Dryden's later Erastianism, in which--in the ideal state--ecclesiastical affairs and poetic practice cooperated under the umbrella of monarchical government.