Erastianism

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Related to Erastians: Thomas Erastus

Erastianism

(ɪˈræstɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the theory that the state should have authority over the church in ecclesiastical matters
[C17: named after Thomas Erastus (1524–83), Swiss theologian to whom such views were attributed]
Eˈrastian n, adj

Erastianism

the doctrine stating that in ecclesiastical affairs the state rules over the church. — Erastian, n., adj.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Erastianism - the doctrine that the state is supreme over the church in ecclesiastical matters
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
References in periodicals archive ?
68) The chapter was titled, "Of the several parties in the assembly of Divines, PRESBYTERIANS, ERASTIANS, INDEPENDENTS.
Although disagreements over political ecclesiology were to prove bitterly divisive, they did not produce a straightforward polarization between binary ideological groupings; certainly the struggle was not simply between the Erastians and their clerical opponents.
For example, Martin assumes that the reader understands the meaning of the following terms describing religious and philosophical groups (presented here in alphabetical order) , even though she never defines any of them: Anabaptists, Antinomianists, Arians, Arminians, Baptists, Cambridge Platonists, Comenians, Congregationalists, Erasminists, Erastians, Fifth Monarchists, Latitudinarians, Levellers, Seekers, Ranters.
112) This was true for erastians such as Selden and Whitelocke, who actually argued that no one but the sinner could judge of his own fitness for Communion, but for other MPs who had yet to consider these broader questions, the primary concerns were probably the ensuring of due process and the avoidance of arbitrary power in church discipline as it was avoided in civil government.
To royalists, moderates, and Erastians who watched such maneuvers from outside either camp, the phenomenon may have felt like a deja-vu, as ministers who had striven to purify and reform the Laudian church in the late 1630s and early 1640s were then themselves accused of replacing tenderness with compulsion.
The presence in Coornhert's Netherlands of Anabaptists, Arminians, Calvinists, Catholics, Erastians, Gomarists, Libertines, Lutherans, Mennonites, Nicodemites, Remonstrants, Sacramentarians, and Zwinglians indicates not only the freedom of religion created by the revolt against Rome but also the potential for seething sectarian disputes.
To him they were the prophetic souls who penetrated to the true foundations of the English church in Christian antiquity; their critics were all enthusiasts, Erastians, or fools.