geometry

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Related to Erlangen program: Felix Klein, Lie group

ge·om·e·try

 (jē-ŏm′ĭ-trē)
n. pl. ge·om·e·tries
1.
a. The mathematics of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, angles, surfaces, and solids.
b. A system of geometry: Euclidean geometry.
c. A geometry restricted to a class of problems or objects: solid geometry.
d. A book on geometry.
2.
a. Configuration; arrangement.
b. A surface shape.
3. A physical arrangement suggesting geometric forms or lines.

[Middle English geometrie, from Old French, from Latin geōmetria, from Greek geōmetriā, from geōmetrein, to measure land : geō-, geo- + metron, measure; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

ge·om′e·tri′cian (jē-ŏm′ĭ-trĭsh′ən, jē′ə-mĭ-), ge·om′e·ter n.

geometry

(dʒɪˈɒmɪtrɪ)
n
1. (Mathematics) the branch of mathematics concerned with the properties, relationships, and measurement of points, lines, curves, and surfaces. See also analytical geometry, non-Euclidean geometry
2. (Mathematics)
a. any branch of geometry using a particular notation or set of assumptions: analytical geometry.
b. any branch of geometry referring to a particular set of objects: solid geometry.
3. a shape, configuration, or arrangement
4. (Art Terms) arts the shape of a solid or a surface
[C14: from Latin geōmetria, from Greek, from geōmetrein to measure the land]

ge•om•e•try

(dʒiˈɒm ɪ tri)

n.
1. the branch of mathematics that deals with the deduction of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, angles, and figures in space.
2. any specific system of this that operates in accordance with a specific set of assumptions: Euclidean geometry.
3. a book on geometry, esp. a textbook.
4. the shape or form of a surface or solid.
5. a design or arrangement of objects in simple rectilinear or curvilinear form.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin geōmetria < Greek geōmetría. See geo-, -metry]

ge·om·e·try

(jē-ŏm′ĭ-trē)
The mathematical study of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, planes, surfaces, angles, and solids.

geometry

the branch of mathematics that treats the measurement, relationship, and properties of points, lines, angles, and flgures in space. — geometer, geometrician, n. — geometric, geometrical, adj.
See also: Mathematics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geometry - the pure mathematics of points and lines and curves and surfacesgeometry - the pure mathematics of points and lines and curves and surfaces
superposition - (geometry) the placement of one object ideally in the position of another one in order to show that the two coincide
duality - (geometry) the interchangeability of the roles of points and planes in the theorems of projective geometry
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
pure mathematics - the branches of mathematics that study and develop the principles of mathematics for their own sake rather than for their immediate usefulness
affine geometry - the geometry of affine transformations
elementary geometry, Euclidean geometry, parabolic geometry - (mathematics) geometry based on Euclid's axioms
fractal geometry - (mathematics) the geometry of fractals; "Benoit Mandelbrot pioneered fractal geometry"
non-Euclidean geometry - (mathematics) geometry based on axioms different from Euclid's; "non-Euclidean geometries discard or replace one or more of the Euclidean axioms"
spherical geometry - (mathematics) the geometry of figures on the surface of a sphere
analytic geometry, analytical geometry, coordinate geometry - the use of algebra to study geometric properties; operates on symbols defined in a coordinate system
plane geometry - the geometry of 2-dimensional figures
solid geometry - the geometry of 3-dimensional space
descriptive geometry, projective geometry - the geometry of properties that remain invariant under projection
plane section, section - (geometry) the area created by a plane cutting through a solid
pencil - a figure formed by a set of straight lines or light rays meeting at a point
conic, conic section - (geometry) a curve generated by the intersection of a plane and a circular cone
eccentricity - (geometry) a ratio describing the shape of a conic section; the ratio of the distance between the foci to the length of the major axis; "a circle is an ellipse with zero eccentricity"
foursquare, square - (geometry) a plane rectangle with four equal sides and four right angles; a four-sided regular polygon; "you can compute the area of a square if you know the length of its sides"
angle of inclination, inclination - (geometry) the angle formed by the x-axis and a given line (measured counterclockwise from the positive half of the x-axis)
diagonal - (geometry) a straight line connecting any two vertices of a polygon that are not adjacent
translate - change the position of (figures or bodies) in space without rotation
construct - draw with suitable instruments and under specified conditions; "construct an equilateral triangle"
inscribe - draw within a figure so as to touch in as many places as possible
circumscribe - to draw a geometric figure around another figure so that the two are in contact but do not intersect
truncate - replace a corner by a plane
congruent - coinciding when superimposed
incongruent - not congruent
Translations
هندسَه
geometrie
geometri
geomeetria
geometria
גאומטריה
रेखा गणित
geometrija
mértangeometria
rúmfræîi
幾何学
기하학
geometrijageometrinisgeometriškai
ģeometrija
geometria
geometrija
geometri

geometry

[dʒɪˈɒmɪtrɪ] Ngeometría f

geometry

[dʒiˈɒmɪtri] n
(MATHEMATICS)géométrie f
(= layout) [thing, place] → géométrie f

geometry

n (Math) → Geometrie f; geometry set (→ Zirkelkasten mmit) → Zeichengarnitur f

geometry

[dʒɪˈɒmɪtrɪ] ngeometria

geometry

(dʒiˈomətri) noun
a branch of mathematics dealing with the study of lines, angles etc. He is studying geometry.
geometric(al) (dʒiəˈmetrik(əl)) adjective
made up of lines, circles etc and with a regular shape. a geometrical design on wallpaper.
ˌgeoˈmetrically adverb
References in periodicals archive ?
The mathematical section of the text follows the Erlangen Program, which develops geometry in terms of a space and a group of transformation of that space.